Trumpeter Jens Lindemann joins New Philharmonic to share the beauty of Armenian classical music

  • New Philharmonic will feature Jens Lindemann presenting Trumpet Concerto by Armenian composer Arutunian at 7:30 p.m. on Sat., Nov. 2 and at 3 p.m. on Sun., Nov. 3 at the McAninch Arts Center.Courtesy of New Philharmonic

    New Philharmonic will feature Jens Lindemann presenting Trumpet Concerto by Armenian composer Arutunian at 7:30 p.m. on Sat., Nov. 2 and at 3 p.m. on Sun., Nov. 3 at the McAninch Arts Center.Courtesy of New Philharmonic

 
Natalia Dagenhart
Updated 10/29/2019 11:13 AM

"Arutunian's Trumpet Concerto … is an energetic powerhouse of Eastern European lyricism and harmonic textures," said classical music critic Jason Sundram. Named "International Brass Personality of the Year" by Brass Herald, world-renowned classical trumpet player Jens Lindemann knows the best way of presenting the energy and the lyricism of Trumpet Concerto written by famous Armenian composer Alexander Arutunian. New Philharmonic prepared a concert program that will feature the music of Arutunian, Wagner and Rimsky-Korsakov and will take place at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, November 2 and at 3 p.m. on Sunday, November 3 at the McAninch Arts Center located at 425 Fawell Blvd. in Glen Ellyn.

If you want to experience the beauty of Armenian classical music, come to this concert. When you hear the sounds of Alexander Arutunian's Trumpet Concerto, your imagination will draw images of the beautiful Caucasus Mountains where warm and picturesque Armenia is located. Its poetic nature with beautiful waterfalls, green mountains, amazing lakes and endless valleys brings joy and peace that are vividly demonstrated in Arutunian's music. As a patriot of his Motherland, the composer was able to present the thoughtful beauty of Armenia through the means of music, particularly through the touching sounds of his Trumpet Concerto.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

"The trumpet is capable of being played with the virtuosity of a violin, the tenderness of the human voice and the stylistic flexibility of the piano," said Lindemann. Being a Julliard graduate, this world-renowned musician has played major concert venues around the world from the New York, Los Angeles and London Philharmonics to Tokyo's Suntory Hall and even the Great Wall of China. His prodigious talent showed in early age and led to numerous nominations and awards, including Grammy and Juno nominations and the prestigious Echo Klassik in Germany. He has performed as a soloist and recording artist with classical stars such as Sir Neville Marriner, Sir Angel Romero, Doc Severinsen, Charles Dutoit, Gerard Schwarz, Eiji Oue, Bramwell Tovey, Jukka Pekka Saraste and the Mormon Tabernacle Choir, and had a solo Command Performance for the Queen of England. New Philharmonic, the only professional orchestra based in DuPage County, is happy to present Lindemann's unique talent.

What makes Arutunian's Trumpet Concerto so interesting? It is full of bright rhythmic characteristics, attractive motives and catchy melodies that resemble Armenian native folk music. They sound exotic, colorful and almost bluesy. Written in 1949-1950, right after a two year period of study in Moscow, this Trumpet Concerto is the composer's sixth major composition and is a relatively early work. It is often referred to as a "virtuoso showpiece" for its unique characteristics. The Soviet trumpeter Timofei Dokschitzer was the first to record the concerto and make it famous. He visited the U.S. in concert and performed it then, although a subsequent performance by Roger Voisin with the Boston Pops Orchestra in 1966 is credited with the U.S premiere of the concerto. Arutunian's Trumpet Concerto is part of the standard trumpet repertoire worldwide.

This concert program will also feature two other gems of classical music that are popular all over the world. "Rienzi Overture" by German composer Richard Wagner will touch everyone's heart with its dramatic tension, melodic splendor, mysterious nature and orchestral brilliance. Written in 1840, "Rienzi Overture" gives a vivid idea of the action of Wagner's opera "Rienzi, der letzte der Tribunen" (commonly referred to as "Rienzi"), which was his fourth and most successful opera. Utterly sensational and unquestionably majestic, this overture reflects important moments of the opera, such as a war call, Rienzi's touching prayer, a military march, and numerous passages that show the dramatic excitement of the opera. Interestingly, Wagner often regarded the opera with scorn, although it is said that this particular work made him famous literally overnight. "Rienzi Overture" is frequently performed separately from the opera itself and is a favorite of orchestras around the world. Under the baton of Maestro Kirk Muspratt, this masterpiece will sound particularly exciting, dynamic and beautiful.

And, of course, this concert wouldn't be full without a piece written by a Russian composer. This time, Maestro Muspratt chose to impress the audience with the symphonic suite "Scheherazade," Op. 35 written by famous Russian composer Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov known for his descriptive orchestrations. His music is so vivid and picturesque that when you listen to it you can almost see the story behind it, and "Scheherazade" is a bright example of this talent of the composer. "Scheherazade" is considered to be one of the staples of the classical music repertoire, along with Rimsky-Korsakov's other great compositions. It is also an example of the composer's frequent use of fairy tale and folk subjects.

by signing up you agree to our terms of service
                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

Rimsky-Korsakov was one of The Five, a group of famous Russian composers called "mighty little heap" (moguchaya kuchka). It included Rimsky-Korsakov, Mily Balakirev, Aleksandr Borodin, César Cui, and Modest Mussorgsky. Their purpose was to assert the musical independence of Russia from the West, and when Borodin died, Rimsky-Korsakov poured himself into finishing Borodin's work. It was during this time that he wrote "Scheherazade," based on the main character in "One Thousand and One Nights" (also known as "The Arabian Nights"). The composer's colorful orchestration and his interest in the East make this suite a beautiful conclusion of the New Philharmonic's concert program. Considering Maestro Muspratt's love to Russian music, it is certain that this masterpiece will impress each and every member of the audience.

It is also important to note that during the concert that will take place at 3 p.m. on Sunday, November 3, COT Annual Young People's Competition Winner, pianist Yuriy Rogachev, will perform Frederic Chopin's "Valse in Am" (Posthumos).

For tickets or more information, please visit https://www.atthemac.org/events/np-jens-lindemann/ or call 630-942-4000. Tickets are $51. A limited number of $10 tickets are available for students with valid ID. A free MAC Chat led by freelance musician and Wheaton College faculty member Kevin Harrison will precede each concert.

Natalia Dagenhart

0 Comments
                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 
Article Comments ()
Guidelines: Keep it civil and on topic; no profanity, vulgarity, slurs or personal attacks. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked. If a comment violates these standards or our terms of service, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box. To find our more, read our FAQ.