Catch a ride in 'Becky's New Car' at Village Theatre Guild this fall

  • Becky Foster (Susan O'Byrne) ventures down the road not taken in the comedy "Becky's New Car," which opens Village Theatre Guild's 57th season.

    Becky Foster (Susan O'Byrne) ventures down the road not taken in the comedy "Becky's New Car," which opens Village Theatre Guild's 57th season. Courtesy of Carl Zeitler

 
Submitted by Carl Zeitler
Updated 9/12/2019 5:57 PM

The Village Theatre Guild starts the engine on their 57th season with "Becky's New Car" by Steven Dietz. The play ponders this question: when you don't know where you're headed, how do you know when you've arrived?

"Becky's New Car" is directed by Glen Ellyn resident Carl Zeitler and produced by Renata Allelujka of Downers Grove. The cast features Susan O'Byrne (Hinsdale), Jamie Ewing (Crystal Lake), Joshua Reid (Mokena), Todd Oakley (Aurora), Shannon Bachelder (Wheaton), Richard Bucchi (Winfield), and Betsey Manzoni (Chicago).

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

Becky Foster is caught in middle age, middle management, and in a middling marriage -- with no prospects for change on the horizon. Then one night a socially inept and grief-struck millionaire stumbles into the car dealership where Becky works. Becky is offered nothing short of a new life and the audience is offered a chance to ride shotgun in a way that most plays wouldn't dare.

"Becky's New Car" is a thoroughly original comedy with serious overtones, a devious and delightful romp down the road not taken.

Zeitler was enthusiastic about the play right away.

"When I read the script, I was very engaged. It was a play that I wanted to see as an audience member. I was fortunate enough that I was able to direct it. It was fresh and interesting to read. I can't wait to see these actors perform this show," he said.

Members of the cast were also drawn to the play.

"Becky is a character who, when I first read the script, I felt was someone who had regrets about choices she did and did not make, and one day she has a chance at something new and, despite consequences, she grabs it by the horns. After I read this script I knew it was a story that I wanted to be apart of," Bachelder commented.

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Oakley is making his debut at Village Theatre Guild with this show. In fact, it has been many years since he last performed in a play.

"This production seemed to be an ideal time to make a comeback. I wanted to get back on stage and the story seemed good. Deep, realistic, not straight comedy, or straight drama, but a nice blending of both. Well written script," he said.

O'Byrne plays Becky in the production and was instantly drawn to the role.

"I felt an immediate connection with Becky. She is a wonderful character: flawed, funny, a little off-kilter, and constantly questioning herself. She embodies the feelings of many of us as we age, coming to terms with who we are in a changing world," she said.

"Becky's New Car" will run for 12 performances over four weekends from Friday, Oct. 18 until Saturday, Nov. 9.

Friday and Saturday performances begin at 8 p.m. and Sunday matinees begin at 3 p.m. This will be no performance Oct. 20.

There are additional matinee performances at 3 p.m. Saturdays, Nov. 2 and 9.

Tickets are now on sale for $19.99 and can be ordered now by calling the box office at (630) 469-8230 or online at www.villagetheatreguild.org.

Free parking is available at Village Theatre Guild, which is located at 2S270 Park Blvd. (near the NW corner of Butterfield Road and Park Blvd) in Glen Ellyn.

O'Byrne believes that audiences will be glad that they came out to see "Becky's New Car." "This is a play that involves the audience on a literal level. Becky invites the audience into her home and her circumstances. The lines between observer and participant are blurred here, in ways that are hilarious and thought-provoking. Beyond that, it's simply a touching, very human play that explores how we adapt to changes in our lives," she said.

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