Become a FrogWatch USA volunteer with Cosley Zoo

  • Learn how to identify frogs and toads during an online training program by Cosley Zoo and FrogWatch USA. Volunteers monitor a wetland site for 3 minutes multiple evenings during breeding season (February-August).

    Learn how to identify frogs and toads during an online training program by Cosley Zoo and FrogWatch USA. Volunteers monitor a wetland site for 3 minutes multiple evenings during breeding season (February-August). Daily Herald file photo

 
 
Posted4/14/2021 4:24 PM

Cosley Zoo, one of 165 FrogWatch USA chapters in the U.S., will host its annual volunteer training this spring.

You do not have to be a frog or toad expert to be a FrogWatch USA volunteer.

 

Cosley Zoo's FrogWatch USA chapter offers public training sessions each spring. The 2021 session is offered virtually on Friday, April 23, from 6 to 8 p.m.

The training sessions are identical. Register online at eventbrite.com or via cosleyzoo.org.

All you need is an interest in frogs and toads, as well as a willingness to participate in a volunteer training session at Cosley Zoo, your local FrogWatch USA Chapter.

Volunteers must commit to monitoring a wetland site for 3 minutes multiple evenings throughout the breeding season (February-August).

For questions about the program, email frogwatchcosleyzoo@wheatonparks.org.

by signing up you agree to our terms of service
                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

The program is open to all, regardless of where they live.

FrogWatch Cosley Zoo is a local chapter of FrogWatch USA, The Association of Zoos and Aquariums' flagship citizen science program that invites individuals and families to learn about the wetlands in their communities and help conserve amphibians by reporting the calls of local frogs and toads.

FrogWatch USA volunteers play an important role in amphibian conservation.

More than 2,000 amphibian species are currently threatened with extinction and many more are experiencing sharp population declines. This alarming trend may be a sign of deteriorating wetland health because amphibians can serve as indicator species.

To learn more about amphibian conservation and FrogWatch USA, visit aza.org.

FrogWatch USA volunteers generate valuable science-based information on frog and toad populations, distribution, and seasonal timing (phenology). Data are collected nationwide by a community of volunteer citizen scientists, date back to 1998, and can be used by land managers, researchers, educators, and decision-makers, or anybody else with an interest in frogs and toads. Volunteers receive training in-person at a local chapter or by taking this online course when an in-person session is not available. This online FrogWatch USA Volunteer Training Course gives you the training and tools needed to become a successful citizen scientist with FrogWatch USA.

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