Overwhelmed by garden produce? Pickle it!

  • Select fresh and firm pickling cucumbers for preservation. Slice a small portion off of the blossom end and use canning or pickling salt, white granulated sugar or brown sugar, and vinegar with 5% acidity in your pickling recipe.

    Select fresh and firm pickling cucumbers for preservation. Slice a small portion off of the blossom end and use canning or pickling salt, white granulated sugar or brown sugar, and vinegar with 5% acidity in your pickling recipe. Courtesy of Mary Liz Wright

 
 
Posted8/4/2022 1:23 PM

Sour, sweet, bread and butter, Kosher dills, spears, chips, or slices on a sandwich, or as a snack or side dish -- pickles are everywhere. For home gardeners with an abundance of cucumbers and other produce, pickling is a great way to preserve your bounty.

While cucumbers are one of the most commonly pickled items, many foods can be pickled says Mary Liz Wright, University of Illinois Extension nutrition and wellness educator.

 

"Fruit, eggs, artichokes, mushrooms -- you name it and it can probably be pickled," Wright says.

Pickling is an ancient form of food preservation, dating back to 2030 BC when cucumbers from India were pickled in the Tigris Valley. The word "pickle" comes from the Dutch pekel or northern German pókel, meaning "salt" or "brine."

The pickling process, for the most part, falls into two categories or methods: quick pickles and fermented pickles. Fresh pack or quick pickles are made with vinegar and salt solution or a vinegar and sugar solution. Fermented pickles require time and salt to do the preserving.

Every region of the world has its own form of pickling as a way to extend the life of fruits and vegetables before refrigeration.

Eastern Europe has Kosher dills and lacto-fermented cabbage, known as sauerkraut.

English sweet pickles are made with vinegar, sugar, and spices, while the French serve tiny, spiced cornichons or cucumbers.

In the Middle East, pickled foods are served with every meal, from olives to lemons. Russians pickle tomatoes, and Koreans have spicy kimchi.

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The Japanese pickle plums and daikon radishes, and Italians pickle eggplants and peppers.

When selecting cucumbers for pickling, chose fresh and firm pickling cucumbers. Cut 1/16 inch off of the blossom end. Use these ingredients in recipes: canning or pickling salt, white granulated sugar or brown sugar, and vinegar with 5% acidity.

To learn more about how to pickle and to find recipes, visit the Illinois Exension website at go.illinois.edu/PicklingFoods.

Or explore the National Center for Home Food Preservation at bit.ly/3LtK6sC.

Connect with your local Illinois Extension county office at go.illinois.edu/ExtensionOffice.

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