Breaking News Bar
updated: 4/11/2013 9:33 AM

ECC students, high schoolers, others entertain crowd

hello
Success - Article sent! close
  • Video: Poetry Slam at ECC

  • Elgin Community College graduate Corey Dillard lights up the crowd with his performance poem, "The Bat Sermon," Wednesday at the ECC Poetry Slam in the Spartan Auditorium. Dillard won the competition, which was judged by students.

       Elgin Community College graduate Corey Dillard lights up the crowd with his performance poem, "The Bat Sermon," Wednesday at the ECC Poetry Slam in the Spartan Auditorium. Dillard won the competition, which was judged by students.
    Christopher Hankins/chankins@ dailyherald.com

  • Elgin Community College student Anneliese Pfatschbacher bows as she finishes her poem, "Strength of Voice," during Wednesday's ECC Poetry Slam.

       Elgin Community College student Anneliese Pfatschbacher bows as she finishes her poem, "Strength of Voice," during Wednesday's ECC Poetry Slam.
    Christopher Hankins | Staff Photographer

  • Students listen closely as a poem is performed Wednesday during the Poetry Slam at Elgin Community College.

       Students listen closely as a poem is performed Wednesday during the Poetry Slam at Elgin Community College.
    Christopher Hankins | Staff Photographer

 
By Christopher Hankins
chankins@dailyherald.com

Some spoke softly and deliberately, while others used nearly the entire stage with arms waving and voices filling the room without a mic.

And that's the beauty of the annual Poetry Slam at Elgin Community College -- anything goes.

Students from the college, as well as area high school seniors, took the stage one by one and performed their own poems about topics ranging from Batman as a larger-than-life prophet, to nuclear war.

Host Marc Smith, creator of the legendary Poetry Slam at the Green Mill in Chicago, begins the annual competition by performing poems himself, and arming the audience with the tools they need to participate along with the performers. If the audience doesn't like what they hear, foot stomping and snapping of fingers can ensue. And if a poem becomes too predictable in its rhyme, listeners join in with the appropriate words along with the performer.

Smith said the idea of "performing" poetry transformed what is, more typically, a reserved art form into a much more exciting experience for listeners.

Share this page
Comments ()
Guidelines: Keep it civil and on topic; no profanity, vulgarity, slurs or personal attacks. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked. If a comment violates these standards or our terms of service, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box. To find our more, read our FAQ.
    help here