Antique Apple Tree Grafting Seminar now slated for March 17

  • Learn how the perfect grocery store apple is a pale shadow of what an apple is supposed to be during the annual Antique Apple Tree Grafting Seminar on Sunday, March 17, at Garfield Farm Museum in Campton Hills.

    Learn how the perfect grocery store apple is a pale shadow of what an apple is supposed to be during the annual Antique Apple Tree Grafting Seminar on Sunday, March 17, at Garfield Farm Museum in Campton Hills. Courtesy of Garfield Farm Museum

  • Apple tree expert Dan Bussey will lead the annual Antique Apple Tree Grafting Seminar on Sunday, March 17, at Garfield Farm Museum in Campton Hills. He bring several different antique varieties of scions.

    Apple tree expert Dan Bussey will lead the annual Antique Apple Tree Grafting Seminar on Sunday, March 17, at Garfield Farm Museum in Campton Hills. He bring several different antique varieties of scions. Courtesy of Garfield Farm Museum

 
Submitted by Garfield Farm Museum
Updated 3/8/2019 11:22 AM

Weather delayed delivery of the root stock for Garfield Farm Museum's 32nd annual Antique Apple Tree Grafting Seminar so it has been rescheduled to 1:30 p.m. Sunday, March 17.

For $30, participants make three grafts of heirloom varieties to take home for planting this spring.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

Garfield Farm Museum is on Garfield Road, off Route 38, five miles west of Geneva.

Reservations are required by calling (630) 584-8485 or email info@garfieldfarm.org.

Apple tree expert Dan Bussey will lead the seminar and bring several different antique varieties of scions. Not only has he rediscovered many antique varieties he also is one of the top experts in the country on historic varieties. He has written "The Illustrated History of Apples in the United States and Canada," a seven-volume work listing all known varieties.

His knowledge of apple varieties' qualities makes the unblemished perfectly shaped standard grocery store apple a pale shadow of what an apple is supposed to be. Apples are either used for cooking, cider, or dessert (eating an apple as is). One might be great for apple pies but not as good for cider.

Likewise, from a growing standpoint, some might ripen early in the summer and others might be late requiring several months of storage before they are at their prime.

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An early apple might satisfy that delayed gratification of waiting from winter until summer for a fresh apple, but ones that required storage before being eaten made apples available long into spring.

Eating "out of season" made possible by worldwide shipping and refrigeration has made worrying about what is left in one's cellar after a long winter a remote experience of the past.

Yet for lovers of cider, pies, and sauces, knowing the traits of each variety is like a wine expert knowing grapes and vintages.

There is a $30 donation for the class and reservations are required. Participants are asked to bring a sharp knife. Call the museum at (630) 584-8485, or email at info@garfieldfarm.org.

Garfield Farm Museum on 375 acres is a historically intact former 1840s farm and teamster inn being restored as an 1840s working farm museum by volunteers and donors from around the country.

Visit www.garfieldfarm.org or www.facebook.com/GarfieldFarmMuseum/.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

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