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updated: 10/26/2012 6:51 PM

Kordik defends survey response, 2005 order of protection

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  • Democrat Deb Conroy, left, opposes Republican Daniel Kordik in the race for the 46th State House District.

      Democrat Deb Conroy, left, opposes Republican Daniel Kordik in the race for the 46th State House District.

 
 

An order of protection against a Republican candidate for Illinois House is raising questions after he denied in a candidate survey having a restraining order against him.

Republican Daniel Kordik of Villa Park was involved in a bitter divorce case with his ex-wife Lorri Kordik in the early 2000s. He denied her allegations of interfering at her office, once grabbing her blouse and once shoving her against a wall, among other things, according to court records.

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"They were proven false," Kordik said.

Lorri Kordik declined to comment for this story.

Still, in July of 2005, the judge in the case signed an order permanently barring Kordik from contacting Lorri, including not allowing him to leave his car when he picked up or dropped off their children.

That order remains in effect today.

A candidate questionnaire for Patch.com during the primary election asked Kordik if he had ever had a restraining order against him or had been successfully sued.

Kordik answered: "No, but as an attorney I have successfully sued on behalf of many clients."

Kordik says the answer isn't inconsistent with the judge's order, which he says is something he agreed to in an effort to move on with the case.

"I didn't consider it a restraining order, and I still don't," Kordik said.

Black's Law Dictionary says a restraining order can also be called a protection order and defines it as an order that prohibits one person from "harassing" or "even contacting" another person.

His opponent, Deb Conroy of Elmhurst, raised questions.

"This is very troubling. Everyone in the district has been totally misled. A full explanation is needed immediately not some legal double talk," Conroy said in a statement.

The two are locked in a race for the 46th House District, which includes parts of Addison, Bloomingdale, Carol Stream, Glendale Heights, Lombard and Villa Park. Both parties often take particular interest in races where no incumbent is running.

• Daily Herald staff writer Josh Stockinger contributed to this report.

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