We asked and readers responded with photos of animals they've adopted

  • The Allison Family of Wheaton named their pandemic puppy Sherlock. Sherlock is a Shetland sheepdog and plays a lot with Ingrid Allison, left, 8, and Greta Allison, 4.

    The Allison Family of Wheaton named their pandemic puppy Sherlock. Sherlock is a Shetland sheepdog and plays a lot with Ingrid Allison, left, 8, and Greta Allison, 4. Courtesy of Kathryn Staron

  • Sergio and Emily Velazquez of St. Charles adopted their 7-month-old Cooper from Dog Patch in Naperville on Aug. 29. Cooper is a Labrador and pit bull mix and was adopted as an anniversary gift. Cooper was abandoned along a Tennessee road, rescued and delivered to Naperville. He loves to go the dog park and play with the other local pups. His favorite thing is to carry sticks twice his size.

    Sergio and Emily Velazquez of St. Charles adopted their 7-month-old Cooper from Dog Patch in Naperville on Aug. 29. Cooper is a Labrador and pit bull mix and was adopted as an anniversary gift. Cooper was abandoned along a Tennessee road, rescued and delivered to Naperville. He loves to go the dog park and play with the other local pups. His favorite thing is to carry sticks twice his size. Courtesy of Sergio and Emily Velazquez

  • Mark, Joan and Adam Hammel of Wildwood adopted Chewie, short for Chewbacca, from Animal House Shelter in Huntley in September. They were told Chewie is a terrier/Shih Tzu mix. The Hammels had been looking for two years for a dog that wouldn't bother their 10-year-old son's allergies. "His sweet demeanor and happy spirit has really lifted us up during this time. We didn't know how much we needed him in our lives. And we in his. Such a beautiful fit for all of us." Here, Adam and Chewie take a nap together.

    Mark, Joan and Adam Hammel of Wildwood adopted Chewie, short for Chewbacca, from Animal House Shelter in Huntley in September. They were told Chewie is a terrier/Shih Tzu mix. The Hammels had been looking for two years for a dog that wouldn't bother their 10-year-old son's allergies. "His sweet demeanor and happy spirit has really lifted us up during this time. We didn't know how much we needed him in our lives. And we in his. Such a beautiful fit for all of us." Here, Adam and Chewie take a nap together. Courtesy of Hammel family

  • Shari Dow of Aurora adopted her family's new cat, Stella, in September from the West Suburban Humane Society in Downers Grove. Stella's name was previously Glory, but her son decided on Stella. The Dows said Stella has adjusted just fine to her new home.

    Shari Dow of Aurora adopted her family's new cat, Stella, in September from the West Suburban Humane Society in Downers Grove. Stella's name was previously Glory, but her son decided on Stella. The Dows said Stella has adjusted just fine to her new home. Courtesy of Shari Dow

  • The Fulkersons of Schaumburg adopted Maggie Mae from Second City Canine Rescue in Palatine in October. She came up from Alabama during one of their rescue missions and is a 5-year-old "super mutt," according to her DNA test. Maggie is a mix of great Pyrenees, Labrador retriever, German shepherd and few others. "We are hoping to get Maggie certified to be a companion dog for our special needs son James," the Fulkersons wrote.

    The Fulkersons of Schaumburg adopted Maggie Mae from Second City Canine Rescue in Palatine in October. She came up from Alabama during one of their rescue missions and is a 5-year-old "super mutt," according to her DNA test. Maggie is a mix of great Pyrenees, Labrador retriever, German shepherd and few others. "We are hoping to get Maggie certified to be a companion dog for our special needs son James," the Fulkersons wrote. Courtesy of Danielle Donaldson Photography

  • The Kim family of Long Grove adopted Eugene in April from Chicagoland Bully Breed Rescue. The family lost a dog in 2019 and said Eugene gave them a much-needed lift. "He's been the loving, cuddly energy we've needed, both at the beginning and throughout the pandemic," Dan Kim said.

    The Kim family of Long Grove adopted Eugene in April from Chicagoland Bully Breed Rescue. The family lost a dog in 2019 and said Eugene gave them a much-needed lift. "He's been the loving, cuddly energy we've needed, both at the beginning and throughout the pandemic," Dan Kim said. Courtesy of Dan Kim

  • Bethany Foster of Elgin adopted her dog, Pepper, in May from The Barn on Baseline animal shelter in Genoa. They are waiting on DNA results, but think she's part pit bull and shepherd. Pepper loves vegetables, squeaky toys and playing fetch.

    Bethany Foster of Elgin adopted her dog, Pepper, in May from The Barn on Baseline animal shelter in Genoa. They are waiting on DNA results, but think she's part pit bull and shepherd. Pepper loves vegetables, squeaky toys and playing fetch. Courtesy of Bethany Foster

 
 
Posted12/27/2020 6:00 AM

When we asked readers to share photos with us of pets they've adopted during the pandemic, we didn't expect 100 photos (and counting) to come pouring in. But that's what happened -- only going to prove what we've known for a long time. Suburbanites are big-hearted and they love their pets.

Carter Bangit of Bartlett makes a nice resting spot for their rescued pigeon Skye. Erica Bangit saw the pigeon in their yard while gardening. It was tagged and didn't fly away. They posted a photo on a local Facebook community page asking if anyone had lost a bird. From there, they learned it was a domesticated pigeon and that it was in danger outside. Great Lakes Pigeon Rescue asked them to try and trap the bird and keep her safe. After a few days they were able to do that. They tried to find the owner, and had her checked by a vet and did a DNA test to determine her gender. They learned she was a girl and that she was a baby pigeon. The owners were never found, so the Bangits kept her. The Bangit family also adopted a dog, Toby, in November.
Carter Bangit of Bartlett makes a nice resting spot for their rescued pigeon Skye. Erica Bangit saw the pigeon in their yard while gardening. It was tagged and didn't fly away. They posted a photo on a local Facebook community page asking if anyone had lost a bird. From there, they learned it was a domesticated pigeon and that it was in danger outside. Great Lakes Pigeon Rescue asked them to try and trap the bird and keep her safe. After a few days they were able to do that. They tried to find the owner, and had her checked by a vet and did a DNA test to determine her gender. They learned she was a girl and that she was a baby pigeon. The owners were never found, so the Bangits kept her. The Bangit family also adopted a dog, Toby, in November. - Courtesy of Erica Bangit

And what better time to add a new furry friend to the family than when we are home more and in need of comfort?

"We didn't know how much we needed him in our lives," a Wildwood family wrote of their newly adopted dog. "His sweet demeanor and happy spirit has really lifted us up during this time."

Many families said their new pet's antics were a welcome distraction from stress and worries.

"She keeps us entertained for hours," an Arlington Heights family wrote about their new puppy. "She makes a great addition to our family."

Mary and Keith Mikell of Arlington Heights adopted their beagle mix, Koda, from Wright-Way Rescue in Morton Grove. "We adopted Koda at 12 weeks old at the beginning of the pandemic," the Mikells said. "She keeps us entertained for hours. She makes a great addition to our family."
Mary and Keith Mikell of Arlington Heights adopted their beagle mix, Koda, from Wright-Way Rescue in Morton Grove. "We adopted Koda at 12 weeks old at the beginning of the pandemic," the Mikells said. "She keeps us entertained for hours. She makes a great addition to our family." - Courtesy of Mary and Keith Mikell

It was more than just cats and dogs adopted during the pandemic, although dogs were definitely the most popular. Readers also sent photos of their cats, birds, bunnies and pocket pets.

Here's a sampling of pet photos readers shared with us. We couldn't fit them all on this page, so look for more next Sunday, Jan. 3; and in a gallery online at www.dailyherald.com.

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