Breaking News Bar
updated: 8/31/2012 12:52 PM

West Nile total climbs to 10 cases in DuPage

hello
Success - Article sent! close
  • DuPage County now has seen 10 confirmed cases of West Nile virus this summer and one West Nile-related death, the county health officials said Friday.

      DuPage County now has seen 10 confirmed cases of West Nile virus this summer and one West Nile-related death, the county health officials said Friday.
    File photo

 
 

DuPage County now has seen 10 confirmed cases of West Nile virus this summer and one West Nile-related death, the county health officials said Friday.

People affected by the virus range in age from their 20s to 70s and live in Carol Stream, Downers Grove, Elmhurst, Lisle, Lombard, Naperville and Villa Park.

Order Reprint Print Article
 
Interested in reusing this article?
Custom reprints are a powerful and strategic way to share your article with customers, employees and prospects.
The YGS Group provides digital and printed reprint services for Daily Herald. Complete the form to the right and a reprint consultant will contact you to discuss how you can reuse this article.
Need more information about reprints? Visit our Reprints Section for more details.

Contact information ( * required )

Success - request sent close

Lombard Village President Bill Mueller, 76, died Aug. 18 from complications of West Nile. He is one of two people statewide to die of West Nile this year, according to the Illinois Department of Public Health. The other death occurred in the only confirmed West Nile case in Kane County.

The state has seen 56 West Nile cases so far this summer in Cook, DuPage, Kane, Lake, Kankakee counties and downstate Crawford county.

While the virus is widespread among mosquitoes in DuPage County, according to the health department, only about one in five people infected will show any symptoms. Fever, headaches, body aches, joint pains, vomiting, diarrhea and rashes can occur in those patients, but the health department says fewer than 1 percent of those infected will develop more serious illnesses such as meningitis.

People older than 50 and those with cancer, diabetes, hypertension, kidney disease and transplanted organs are at a greater risk for serious illness.

There is no vaccine against West Nile and no medications to treat infections, so the health department encourages residents to use insect repellent, wear long sleeves and pants from dusk to dawn, fix holes in window screens and empty areas of standing water.

Share this page
Comments ()
Guidelines: Keep it civil and on topic; no profanity, vulgarity, slurs or personal attacks. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked. If a comment violates these standards or our terms of service, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box. To find our more, read our FAQ.