Glenbrook North graduate one of five nationally to earn broadcast journalism scholarship

  • Glenbrook North High School senior records the COVID-19 Edition of Spartan News Now. It usually would have been produced in the high school's studio, but due to Illinois' stay-at-home order, he shot the episode in his basement.

    Glenbrook North High School senior records the COVID-19 Edition of Spartan News Now. It usually would have been produced in the high school's studio, but due to Illinois' stay-at-home order, he shot the episode in his basement. Courtesy of Ryan Levy

  • Ethan Levy

    Ethan Levy

 
 
Updated 7/9/2020 3:35 PM

The moral of this story is to check your voice mail.

Recent Glenbrook North graduate Ethan Levy was on his summer job, delivering pizza, when he got a phone call from Kentucky.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

"I don't really know anyone from Kentucky," he told the Northbrook Herald.

Levy let the call go to voicemail figuring it was spam. He delivered a pie, got back in his car and checked the message.

It was no robot.

It was the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences notifying the incoming University of Missouri journalism student that he had been awarded the $10,000 Linda Giannecchini Memorial Trustees Scholarship given to a student pursuing a career in the television industry.

He is the first Glenbrook North student to have earned this level of scholarship for achievement in broadcasting, according to Glenbrook High School District 225 public relations and communications specialist Tarah O'Connell.

Levy, who recorded a 3.83 grade-point average, oversaw more than 60 projects during the 2019-20 school year as executive producer for Glenbrook North Broadcasting.

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"He has technology skill and performer skill. Many people have one, but not both," said broadcasting teacher Todd Rubin.

Levy has already been placed into three journalism classes at Mizzou -- each of those in-person, at this point -- where he plans to study broadcast journalism.

One of five college-bound seniors selected by NATAS for a national scholarship, it came on top of Levy earning the NATAS Chicago Midwest Chapter's $2,500 Board of Governors Scholarship.

"I am so grateful and honored to be receiving not only the scholarship but the recognition from NATAS at both the regional and national levels," Levy said. "I'm very appreciative they've taken time to recognize my potential as an incoming college freshman, and very excited to see where I end up four years from now as I hopefully walk across the stage or football field at Mizzou."

At Glenbrook North, where he was a finalist for the school's "Outstanding Boy" award his senior year, Rubin said Levy did far more than merely reach his potential.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

"Since the day he walked in the door at Glenbrook North, he has been a massive piece of our broadcast department," Rubin said. "In the four years he's been there, he helped our program grow in innumerable ways. Whether it be technology, our live production crew or in-class curriculum, he has his imprint on every piece of Glenbrook North Broadcasting."

Levy is so invested that Rubin said he installed equipment at the high school that would enable him to dial in remotely from college in Columbia to provide help if necessary.

"He takes that much pride in what we do. He's special," Rubin said.

What's special is discovering you just made $10,000 while delivering a pizza.

"Honestly, I was shocked when I got that call," Levy said.

"I don't know what the best way to put it is, but I wasn't dead-set on getting that scholarship because I know I worked with a lot of people who are incredibly talented, passionate and driven in the world of broadcast journalism at the high school level. It was an honor to know that I was competing against all of those people who have similar aspirations and mindsets," he said.

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