Grant victorious in House Dist. 42 after Burt Minor controversy

  • Amy Grant

    Amy Grant

  • From left, Ryan Byrne, Amy Grant and Burt Minor are Republican candidates for the 42nd state House

    From left, Ryan Byrne, Amy Grant and Burt Minor are Republican candidates for the 42nd state House

 
 
Updated 3/21/2018 8:03 AM

Amy Grant, a DuPage County Board member from Wheaton, declared victory in Tuesday's Republican primary race for Illinois House District 42,

"That sounds good to me," Grant said, as she started receiving congratulatory texts on her phone. "I'm happy about that."

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

In a race marked by controversy surrounding her opponent Burt Minor, Grant won with a commanding 66 percent of the vote (7,223 votes) compared to 22 percent (2,426 votes) for Minor with 100 percent of the precincts reporting. Political newcomer Ryan Byrne, 29, of Wheaton, finished third with 1,246 votes, for 11 percent. Grant, 62. will face Democrat Kathleen V. Carrier of Carol Stream in the Nov. 6 general election for the seat Jeanne Ives vacated in her bid for the Republican nomination for governor, which came up a little short against incumbent Bruce Rauner.

Rumors that Ives might want her old House seat back were dismissed by Grant, who found out her campaign was victorious as she was leaving Ives' Election Night rally.

"She would never do that," Grant said of her friend.

Grant was backed by Republican state Rep. Peter Breen of Lombard, who a month ago led a campaign accusing Minor of using a homosexual slur and a racial epithet while meeting in October with successful GOP attorney general candidate Erika Harold of Urbana. Breen, U.S. Rep. Randy Hultgren, state Rep. David Olsen of Downers Grove and other Republicans had called for Minor to leave the race.

Harold and Minor, the Winfield Township Republican chairman, were embroiled in a bitter battle of words with Harold saying Minor used the N-word repeatedly and asked if she were a lesbian during an introductory meeting the pair had in October. Minor, 58, of Warrenville, said he used the N-word once and only after Harold asked him what that expression meant. He also said Harold encouraged him to ask about her sexual identity. Harold said that isn't true and that she made it clear during the meeting that she was offended, and Minor disputed her claim.

Grant said that controversy would have no effect on the general election.

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