In Schaumburg, Rauner tells credit union convention 'I'm working for you'

  • Gov. Bruce Rauner meets with attendees of the Illinois Credit Union League Convention Friday at the Schaumburg Convention Center. Rauner drew applause when he vowed to reduce bureaucracy.

      Gov. Bruce Rauner meets with attendees of the Illinois Credit Union League Convention Friday at the Schaumburg Convention Center. Rauner drew applause when he vowed to reduce bureaucracy. Eric Peterson | Staff Photographer

 
 
Updated 4/17/2015 5:33 PM

Gov. Bruce Rauner received a warm reception when he dropped by the Illinois Credit Union League Convention for its final minutes at the Schaumburg Convention Center on Friday afternoon.

And while Rauner conceded that not every aspect of his "turnaround agenda" in Springfield was relevant to the credit union industry, he asked for members' support.

 

"I'm here because I'm working for you," Rauner told the assembled crowd from one end of the convention floor. "You are the backbone of the Illinois economy. If you are succeeding, all of Illinois is succeeding."

Rauner received applause when he vowed to reduce the government bureaucracy on the backs of businesses.

Though he conceded that his goals for the state sound ambitious, he said they could be accomplished through the passage of only six or seven bills -- a fraction of the approximately 600 approved in Springfield every year.

Rauner said he's been involved with several turnarounds in his working life, and that the way to get them done is to start big rather than nibbling at the edges.

"Crisis creates opportunity, and oh boy, do we have a crisis in this state," Rauner said.

Rauner said his months as governor have been invigorating due to the number of hardworking people he's met, but also frustrating from the effect the state's financial and economic policies have had on the middle class.

Though he said he's trying to instill some financial discipline through budget cuts right now, Rauner insisted that the ultimate path to a brighter future is through the growth of businesses.

"In the long run, we can't cut and we can't tax," Rauner said. "We have to grow."

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