Fermilab Art & Lecture Series' Gallery Talk to explore 'Imagining Reality' Jan. 12

  • On Tuesday, Jan. 12, Fermilab's Steve Geer will lead the next virtual "Gallery Talk" on "Imagining Reality." His 2017 project "River Ice" explores the textured surface of the frozen Chicago River.

    On Tuesday, Jan. 12, Fermilab's Steve Geer will lead the next virtual "Gallery Talk" on "Imagining Reality." His 2017 project "River Ice" explores the textured surface of the frozen Chicago River. Courtesy of Fermilab Art & Lecture Series

 
Submitted by Fermilab Art & Lecture Series
Posted1/7/2021 2:37 PM

On Tuesday, Jan. 12, the Fermilab Art & Lecture Series will present its next virtual "Gallery Talk" on "Imagining Reality," a photographic journey with Fermilab's Steve Geer.

The program will begin at 7:30 p.m.

 

It is free but registration required at events.fnal.gov/art-gallery/.

In January 2017, Geer began the project "River Ice," taking photographs of the transformation of the Chicago River. "While it lasts, the floating ice is always in motion and the compositions formed by its broken sheets and irregular polygons are forever changing," Geer stated on his website. "The appearance of the textured surface also changes with the light as clouds come and go and, as the day progresses, the color palette varies from fiery-heat to frigid-cold."

Geer says, "As a Fermilab scientist we are trained to imagine how the real world works and then create theories or experiments or new technologies. The arts work in a similar way: imagine and then create. I will describe this process as applied to various photographic projects that I have been exhibited in galleries in the U.S. and Europe and published in books and magazines."

To see more of Geer's work, visit www.stevegeer.com.

The February "Gallery Talk" will be "Finding the Significant in the Insignificant" with 2017 artist-in-residence Jim Jenkins. Connecting the dots of three visions of time with a careful study of how science, technology, art and mathematics, utilize aspects of human creativity to advance a specific timeline in space.

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