St. Viator to stage 'Pride & Prejudice' Oct. 17-20

  • Students from St. Viator High School in Arlington Heights will stage Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice" Oct. 17-20.

    Students from St. Viator High School in Arlington Heights will stage Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice" Oct. 17-20. Courtesy of St. Viator High School

  • St. Viator High School will stage Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice." Students say they love the challenge of doing British accents for the production.

    St. Viator High School will stage Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice." Students say they love the challenge of doing British accents for the production. Courtesy of St. Viator High School

  • Students from St. Viator High School rehearse a scene from Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice." Performances are Oct. 17-20.

    Students from St. Viator High School rehearse a scene from Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice." Performances are Oct. 17-20. Courtesy of St. Viator High School

 
Submitted by St. Viator High School
Posted10/15/2019 11:40 AM

One of Jane Austen's most popular novels, "Pride & Prejudice," comes to life at St. Viator High School. The show takes place at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday, Oct. 17, 18 and 19; and 1:30 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 20. Tickets are $5 at the door.

Though written more than 200 years ago, the story of the spirited Bennet sisters and their quest to find husbands -- including the pert Elizabeth and her sparring partner, Mr. Darcy -- continues to resonate with students and audiences alike.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

"It cleverly explores themes as relevant today as they were in 1815: marriage, wealth, class, courtship and the proper behavior of young people," says Director Kate Costello, who has adapted and simplified the play to emphasize its comedy as well as social commentary and romance.

Senior Chris Sevilla of Mount Prospect shares the role of Mr. Darcy with senior Stefano Lazni. He is enjoying developing the characterization for Darcy and his changing emotions through the course of the play.

"In the first act, he's reserved and sees himself above the Bennett family," Chris says, "but he softens in the second act once he and Elizabeth find common ground and find they share the same values."

Junior Austin Jones of Des Plaines has sunk his teeth into playing the story's main antagonist, George Wickham, the military officer who tries to woo several of the Bennet sisters.

by signing up you agree to our terms of service
                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

"It's almost fun to play a villain," says Austin, who shares the role with sophomore Christopher Rapala. "I get to be melodramatic, sly and crafty. I'm really enjoying exploring just what I can do."

Austin, like many of his classmates, has worked hard to nail a British accent for the show, not just to set the time period, but to get themselves into character.

"I'm always conscious of it," Austin says, "but it's fun to be an officer and put on a uniform, top hat and cane. It just adds to becoming the character."

His classmate, junior Alex Di Marco of Arlington Heights, plays the youngest sister, Lydia, who ends up running away with Wickham. She had no problem mastering the accent, she says.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

"I love doing accents," says Alex, who shares the role with Erin Cavender. "It's super fun. And when you put on the costume and talk in a different voice, it just helps you channel your character."

Costello says that although the times and social etiquette have changed dramatically, many of the characters still ring true today.

"The women in this play are strong, freethinking, intelligent women, and men are drawn to them for their minds as well as their looks," Costello says. "Some characters are gold-diggers, social climbers and gossips, and they provide the basis for much of the comedy.

"But, in the end," she adds, "it is the daughters who have their own ideas about determining their futures."

0 Comments
                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 
Article Comments ()
Guidelines: Keep it civil and on topic; no profanity, vulgarity, slurs or personal attacks. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked. If a comment violates these standards or our terms of service, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box. To find our more, read our FAQ.