Activists on both sides of abortion battle demonstrate in suburbs

  • Abortion opponents rally Friday in Palatine following a historic U.S. Supreme Court ruling that struck down the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision.

      Abortion opponents rally Friday in Palatine following a historic U.S. Supreme Court ruling that struck down the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision. Russell Lissau | Staff Photographer

  • A passerby gives a thumbs up to abortion opponents Friday during a rally in Palatine.

      A passerby gives a thumbs up to abortion opponents Friday during a rally in Palatine. Russell Lissau | Staff Photographer

  • Corrine Marsala of Bolingbrook stands across the street from the Planned Parenthood health center in Aurora on Friday, a few hours after the news broke on the Supreme Court's abortion ruling.

    Corrine Marsala of Bolingbrook stands across the street from the Planned Parenthood health center in Aurora on Friday, a few hours after the news broke on the Supreme Court's abortion ruling. Sandy Bressner/Shaw Local News Network

  • State Rep. Terra Costa Howard, a Glen Ellyn Democrat, closes her eyes as the crowd applauds her comments at a rally for abortion rights Friday in Wheaton.

      State Rep. Terra Costa Howard, a Glen Ellyn Democrat, closes her eyes as the crowd applauds her comments at a rally for abortion rights Friday in Wheaton. John Starks | Staff Photographer

  • Susan Becker, a Downers Grove resident, wears a black funeral veil and holds a sign reading "Here lie women's rights Jan 22, 1973-June 24, 2022 R.I.P." at a rally Friday at the Henry J. Hyde Judicial Office Facility in Wheaton.

      Susan Becker, a Downers Grove resident, wears a black funeral veil and holds a sign reading "Here lie women's rights Jan 22, 1973-June 24, 2022 R.I.P." at a rally Friday at the Henry J. Hyde Judicial Office Facility in Wheaton. John Starks | Staff Photographer

  • Suburbanites protest Friday's Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade at a rally at the Henry J. Hyde Judicial Office Facility in Wheaton.

      Suburbanites protest Friday's Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade at a rally at the Henry J. Hyde Judicial Office Facility in Wheaton. John Starks | Staff Photographer

  • In Wheaton, more than 130 people rallied Friday for abortion rights.

      In Wheaton, more than 130 people rallied Friday for abortion rights. John Starks | Staff Photographer

  • Abortion-rights supporters leave a rally Friday at the Henry J. Hyde Judicial Office Facility in Wheaton and march to an early voting location.

      Abortion-rights supporters leave a rally Friday at the Henry J. Hyde Judicial Office Facility in Wheaton and march to an early voting location. John Starks | Staff Photographer

 
 
Updated 6/24/2022 9:29 PM

People on both sides of the abortion fight commandeered parks, sidewalks and other public venues Friday across Chicago and the suburbs to celebrate -- or protest -- the U.S. Supreme Court's decision to overturn the 1973 Roe v. Wade ruling.

About 30 abortion foes gathered at the Rita Mullins Volunteer Plaza at the corner of Northwest Highway and Hicks Road in Palatine midday Friday to rejoice over the court's decision.

 

With Christian pop music playing over a portable public address system, they waved signs at passing cars with slogans such as "Honk against abortion" -- and they cheered when the drivers obliged.

Rally organizer Maria Goldstein, a Rolling Meadows resident and the co-founder of Northwest Families for Life, said the court's ruling gave her and other anti-abortion activists hope that more pregnant women will make decisions "that will give life, not take life."

Not all the drivers who passed the demonstrators agreed with their cause, as the Rev. Calvin Lindstrom of Christian Liberty Academy noted in a group prayer.

"We thank you for the honks of approval today and even the fingers raised," Lindstrom said.

The Palatine rally was one of many in the suburbs -- both for and against the ruling.

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Anti-abortion demonstrators also were scheduled to gather Friday in Chicago, Downers Grove, Highland Park, Woodstock and elsewhere. Abortion-rights supporters assembled in Chicago, Arlington Heights, Aurora and other suburbs.

In Wheaton, more than 130 people rallied in support of abortion rights. State Rep. Terra Costa Howard, a Glen Ellyn Democrat, was among those who spoke to the crowd.

"It's not just a women's issue," she said of abortion. "It's a family issue. It's a people issue. It's a human being issue."

"Today, the Supreme Court said, 'We don't care,'" Costa Howard added. "It's absolutely devastating to watch them disregard precedent."

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

Dressed in the red cape and white hat of "The Handmaid's Tale," a book and television series about women forced to bear children for others, organizer Jax West of Lisle spoke of the importance of suburban rallies as well as those in Chicago.

"People in the suburbs don't always get this opportunity," said West, of Illinois Handmaids.

Illinois NOW President Laura Welsh attended the Naperville protest.

"Over 350 pro-choice people showed up in Naperville to protest the horrific SCOTUS decision," she said after the rally. "Next, every single one of them who can will vote. Our legislators need to wake up and hear our anger.

"Suburban women turned the 'burbs a beautiful shade of purple. But we're aiming for blue."

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