Syed and Martelli lead in Glen Ellyn District 41, Bruno and Loebach also win

  • Tayyaba Syed

    Tayyaba Syed

  • Robert Bruno

    Robert Bruno

  • Adam Collins

    Adam Collins

  • Jodee Dunham

    Jodee Dunham

  • Abigail Emerson

    Abigail Emerson

  • Jason Loebach

    Jason Loebach

  • Chris Martelli

    Chris Martelli

  • Millie Sessions

    Millie Sessions

  • Upper from left, Robert Bruno, Adam Collins, Jodee Dunham, Abigail Emerson and lower from left, Jason Loebach, Chris Martelli, Millie Sessions and Tayyaba Syed are candidates for Glen Ellyn District 41 school board in the April 6, 2021 election.

    Upper from left, Robert Bruno, Adam Collins, Jodee Dunham, Abigail Emerson and lower from left, Jason Loebach, Chris Martelli, Millie Sessions and Tayyaba Syed are candidates for Glen Ellyn District 41 school board in the April 6, 2021 election.

 
 
Updated 4/7/2021 12:23 AM

Final results Tuesday in the Glen Ellyn Elementary District 41 school board election showed the two incumbents holding on to their jobs.

Board President Robert Bruno had 2,677 votes and Vice President Jason Loebach had 2,589, with 100% of precincts reporting, according to unofficial tallies.

 

It was two newcomers, however, who won the most support -- Tayyaba Syed with 2,794 votes and Chris Martelli with 2,753. There were four board seats open.

Four other challengers showed the following numbers: Abigail Emerson with 1,945; Millie Sessions with 1,930; Jodee Dunham with 1,622; and Adam Collins with 1,564.

Bruno, Loebach, Martelli and Syed favored the district's approach to the COVID-19 crisis. All four received the endorsement of the teachers union.

The two incumbents, both elected four years ago, said the district has kept students safe by consulting health experts and adhering to ever-evolving state guidelines. Over the course of the pandemic, the district provided at least some daily in-person and remote learning and now leads a countywide initiative to address learning disruptions through a summer program for students.

On the opposing side, Emerson, Collins, Sessions and Dunham contended the board moved too slowly to restore full in-person instruction, pointing to families of special needs children who were struggling with the learning models. Dunham's social media posts, some of which embraced a QAnon conspiracy theory adherent and showed resistance to mask rules, became campaign fodder in recent weeks.

Beyond the pandemic, new board members will confront long-standing issues with space constraints in schools as well as efforts to expand early childhood learning and offer full-day kindergarten.

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