New residential facility to help people with eating disorders coming to Winfield

  • The interior of the Monte Nido Chicago eating disorders treatment center in Winfield, including this central living and lounge area, is designed to provide a calming setting for patients to address the reasons they have suffered from disordered eating.

      The interior of the Monte Nido Chicago eating disorders treatment center in Winfield, including this central living and lounge area, is designed to provide a calming setting for patients to address the reasons they have suffered from disordered eating. Photos by Rick West | Staff Photographer

  • A new eating disorders treatment center called Monte Nido Chicago is set to open Monday in Winfield, providing residential treatment that focuses on restoring mental, physical and nutritional health.

    A new eating disorders treatment center called Monte Nido Chicago is set to open Monday in Winfield, providing residential treatment that focuses on restoring mental, physical and nutritional health.

  • Carrie Hunnicutt shows off one of the bedrooms during a tour Friday of Monte Nido Chicago, a new eating disorders treatment center set to open Monday in Winfield.

    Carrie Hunnicutt shows off one of the bedrooms during a tour Friday of Monte Nido Chicago, a new eating disorders treatment center set to open Monday in Winfield.

 
 
Updated 3/4/2020 9:52 AM

Adults suffering from eating disorders can seek treatment at a new residential facility set to open Monday in Winfield.

Monte Nido Chicago will offer treatment stays typically of 40 to 60 days to help people 18 and older restore their mental, physical and nutritional health and recover from disordered eating.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

The company is conducting admissions now for its first eight patients, who will undergo psychotherapy to get to the root of what is causing their problems, be it with anorexia, bulimia, excessive exercise or binge eating. Patients will receive treatment inside a large house in Winfield designed to be a calming setting.

Dr. Joel Jahraus is chief medical officer for Monte Nido and an eating disorders specialist. He pursued the field after growing up with a sister who suffered from bulimia and anorexia.

When patients make themselves throw up after eating, as they do with bulimia, or starve themselves, as they do with anorexia, Jahraus said there is never only one reason.

"It's not just the food. So many people think it's just a food issue. But there are lots of things associated with it. Hardly anyone comes in with just an eating disorder," Jahraus said. "Anxiety and depression and trauma and many other factors go along with it."

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Staff members at Monte Nido Chicago -- including psychiatrists, nutritionists and nurses, the latter available 24/7 -- will work to address the mental reasons for disordered eating, the act of eating itself and the medical complications that can come from prolonged periods of starvation or malnutrition.

"We're diving deep to really help the individuals figure out what drives this eating disorder and then teach them ways to develop insights and coping skills," Jahraus said.

Monte Nido Chicago will not offer outpatient therapy but will coordinate with other providers to continue care for patients if they need further help once their stay at the Winfield facility is over. Jahraus said the company takes most insurance plans and can create an out-of-network provider contract with other coverage plans with which it does not already have a deal.

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