Dozens of students maketh Shakespeare cometh alive in Grant High School production

  • Hermia, played by Alaska Field, and Lysander, played by Deon Lopez, perform in Grant High School's rehearsal of "A Midsummer Night's Dream, by William Shakespeare" at the Fox Lake school Thursday.

      Hermia, played by Alaska Field, and Lysander, played by Deon Lopez, perform in Grant High School's rehearsal of "A Midsummer Night's Dream, by William Shakespeare" at the Fox Lake school Thursday. John Starks | Staff Photographer

  • Forest Fairies gather in Grant High School's rehearsal of "A Midsummer Night's Dream, by William Shakespeare" at the Fox Lake school Thursday.

      Forest Fairies gather in Grant High School's rehearsal of "A Midsummer Night's Dream, by William Shakespeare" at the Fox Lake school Thursday. John Starks | Staff Photographer

  • Tristan Mesmer performs on stage, playing the part of overly confidant Nick Bottom, in Grant High School's rehearsal of "A Midsummer Night's Dream, by William Shakespeare" at the Fox Lake school Thursday.

      Tristan Mesmer performs on stage, playing the part of overly confidant Nick Bottom, in Grant High School's rehearsal of "A Midsummer Night's Dream, by William Shakespeare" at the Fox Lake school Thursday. John Starks | Staff Photographer

 
 
Updated 11/21/2019 7:19 PM

A tremendous stage playeth can only best be accurately presented by a tremendous cast and creweth. And yond is what thee shall findeth as Grant Community High School presents "A Midsummer Night's Dream, by William Shakespeare."

The Fox Lake school performance is packed with 23 student actors, one real dog, and 57 student crew members and designers who help it run smoothly.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

"I knew these talented students would not only answer my call to create but would reach beyond themselves to enlighten and inspire others." wrote director Beth Suehr in the program.

The 400-year-old play centers around five couple's love stories in which the gods play with mortals' lives first by accident and then by enjoyment. The Shakespearean comedy exemplifies how beauty is in the eye of the beholder. It also features Shakespeare's iconic play within a play at the end in which all hilarity ensues.

Performances are Friday and Saturday, Nov. 22 and 23, at 7 p.m. and Sunday, Nov. 24, at 2 p.m. Tickets are $5 for students/senior citizens and $7 for adults.

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