Favorite artifacts from Elmhurst History Museum that you'll eventually be able to see again

  • Carl Sandburg's No. 5 Underwood typewriter is one of the premier artifacts on exhibit at the Elmhurst History Museum.

    Carl Sandburg's No. 5 Underwood typewriter is one of the premier artifacts on exhibit at the Elmhurst History Museum. Courtesy Elmhurst History Museum

 
Daily Herald report
Updated 4/17/2020 6:46 AM

We recently asked the Elmhurst History Museum staff to consider which artifacts on display in the museum's closed galleries they would most like to share with the public when the doors reopen after this socially distant time.

Dan Lund, curator of the collection, shared these three favorites from the museum's exhibit "By All Accounts: The Story of Elmhurst," an ongoing exhibit on the city's history.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

Carl Sandburg's Typewriter

One of the premier artifacts on display in the "core exhibit" is a typewriter that belonged to Pulitzer-prize winning poet Carl Sandburg. The No. 5 Underwood belonged to Sandburg while he lived in Elmhurst at 331 S. York St. from 1919 through 1928, a prolific creative period that saw him write a two-volume biography of Abraham Lincoln, as well as a compilation of ballads and folk songs, "American Songbag."

Keebler Elf

The Keebler Elf called Elmhurst home from 1968 through 1996.
The Keebler Elf called Elmhurst home from 1968 through 1996. - Courtesy Elmhurst History Museum

This souvenir recalls a time when the world headquarters of Keebler Corporation called Elmhurst home. Located at One Hollow Tree Lane, Keebler was housed on the north side of Elmhurst from 1968 through 1996, at which time the company was acquired by Kellogg and moved to Battle Creek, Michigan. Many people who grew up during this era will undoubtedly remember the catchy jingle that touted the Keebler cookies that were "made by little elves in a hollow tree."

Interactive Map

The interactive digital tabletop map is an award-winning exhibit.
The interactive digital tabletop map is an award-winning exhibit. - Courtesy Elmhurst History Museum

The interactive digital tabletop map, an award-winning exhibit, offers visitors the chance to seamlessly view how Elmhurst has developed over time. Visitors can jump through the decades and view more than 250 photographs of Elmhurst from the 1860s through the present day. It's always one of the most popular features when people explore the "By All Accounts" exhibit.

While waiting to reopen its galleries at 120 E. Park Ave., the Elmhurst History Museum staff has developed a number of online resources and tours for those interested in exploring history from home on its website at www.elmhursthistory.org.

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