Troubling trend for Chicago Blackhawks

                                                                                                                                                                                                   
  • Tampa Bay Lightning center Tyler Johnson, left, celebrates after scoring his second goal against Chicago Blackhawks goalie Corey Crawford (50) as defenseman Duncan Keith (2) looks on during the third period of an NHL hockey game Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2017, in Chicago. The Lightning won 5-2.

    Tampa Bay Lightning center Tyler Johnson, left, celebrates after scoring his second goal against Chicago Blackhawks goalie Corey Crawford (50) as defenseman Duncan Keith (2) looks on during the third period of an NHL hockey game Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2017, in Chicago. The Lightning won 5-2.

 
 
Updated 1/25/2017 8:01 PM

During a long, arduous NHL season, it's dangerous to analyze short-term trends that may be much ado about nothing.

For instance, Richard Panik scoring 6 goals in the first six games didn't mean he was going to suddenly become a 50- or 60-goal scorer.

 

Or just because the Chicago Blackhawks allowed 15 power-play goals in the first eight games didn't mean they were going to allow 150 by April 8.

Some trends, though, are worth more attention, and one that has become concerning is the Hawks' penchant for allowing opponents to score back-to-back goals in such a short about of time.

"That's a trend that, especially last two third periods, it's crept into our game," coach Joel Quenneville said of Vancouver scoring twice in 46 seconds Sunday and Tampa Bay doing the same in 30 seconds Tuesday.

This trend has been rearing its ugly head for much more than the past two games. The Hawks have allowed 2 goals in less than five minutes in five of the past six games, and 10 of the last 19.

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And six times it has been 2 goals in 65 seconds or less.

"That's a huge part of the game," said defenseman Trevor van Riemsdyk, who was on the ice for 3 of Tampa Bay's goals in the Hawks' 5-3 loss. "You seem to think games are going one way and then a goal is scored and the momentum keeps going.

"So it's important when we give up a goal to just keep it simple on that next shift. Make it a smart shift. Try to win that next draw, get the puck in their end and pin them down there."

Since Dec. 15, the Hawks are 4-6-0 when opponents score twice in less than five minutes. In 3 of those losses, the Hawks either led or the game was tied in the third period when the quick strikes occurred.

For many years, coaches used to burn their timeout when they sensed the momentum was getting away. Now, though, it rarely happens because you need the timeout to challenge a goal.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

"I would say the challenge has changed the use of the timeout, whether it's for icings or for momentum changes, for sure," Quenneville said.

Said Brian Campbell, a veteran of 1,050 regular-season games: "Yeah, I'm sure it does (help). … They score a few goals and you're trying to calm the opposing team down, or give them a little break."

So with their coach not coming to the rescue, the Hawks must buckle down and practice what they preach when it comes to stopping the bleeding before it becomes an ugly, open wound.

"With us, it's more sustaining that pressure and presence," Campbell said. "Sometimes (we're) scoring a couple, but then we kind of get a little off our game and the other team scores and starts coming back. We're trying to make our game more complete for sure."

• Follow John on Twitter @johndietzdh

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