Local artists to share their work at Naper Settlement

  • The annual Fine Arts Fair is the Naperville Woman's Club's largest fundraiser of the year, and the club also donates proceeds to local food pantries. "The fair has raised money for charitable organizations since it was started," said Roxanne Lang, art fair director and special events coordinator.

    The annual Fine Arts Fair is the Naperville Woman's Club's largest fundraiser of the year, and the club also donates proceeds to local food pantries. "The fair has raised money for charitable organizations since it was started," said Roxanne Lang, art fair director and special events coordinator. Daily Herald File Photo

  • The annual Fine Arts Fair fits in with the mission of the Naperville Woman's Club, which was started by a group of women who wanted to promote knowledge and culture in the community, said Roxanne Lang, art fair director and special events coordinator.

    The annual Fine Arts Fair fits in with the mission of the Naperville Woman's Club, which was started by a group of women who wanted to promote knowledge and culture in the community, said Roxanne Lang, art fair director and special events coordinator. Daily Herald File Photo

  • It is expected that 3,000 to 4,000 people will attend the 53rd annual Fine Arts Fair. "There's beautiful works of art people wouldn't see unless they came to the show," said Roxanne Lang, art fair director and special events coordinator.

    It is expected that 3,000 to 4,000 people will attend the 53rd annual Fine Arts Fair. "There's beautiful works of art people wouldn't see unless they came to the show," said Roxanne Lang, art fair director and special events coordinator. Daily Herald File Photo

  • It's important that art be promoted in the community, said Marie Gnesda, who will judge this year's art. "If we don't have beauty, I think our life becomes boring," she said. "We need art to inspire."

    It's important that art be promoted in the community, said Marie Gnesda, who will judge this year's art. "If we don't have beauty, I think our life becomes boring," she said. "We need art to inspire." Daily Herald File Photo

 
By Annalisa Rodriguez
arodriguez@dailyherald.com
Posted7/11/2012 3:40 PM

Anne Hanley is a seasoned art fair veteran who, in 2000, began regularly displaying her batik art at fairs.

"It's an ancient form of art that the Indonesians practiced on fabric with dyes," she said. "Batik is a traditional method of waxing and dying on fabric."

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

Hanley's method involves layering watercolors and hot wax on rice paper, then removing the wax by ironing. When the wax is lifted, images are revealed underneath.

The Wheaton native's techniques have landed her an award in NICHE magazine and top spots in art fair contests around Illinois, including the Naperville Woman's Club's Fine Art Fair.

The 53rd annual Fine Art Fair takes place 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, July 14 and 15 at Naper Settlement, 523 S. Webster St., Naperville. More than 100 artists will sell their work, which will include ceramics, paintings, mixed media, glass art, sculpture, jewelry and photography, among other forms of art.

The art fair is hosted by the Naperville Woman's Club, which was started in 1897 by a group of women who wanted to promote knowledge and culture in the Naperville community, said Roxanne Lang, art fair director and special events coordinator.

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The event is the club's largest fundraiser of the year, and a part of the proceeds goes to a North Central College art scholarship.

"We want to promote art in the community and learning about the community," Lang said. "That's one of the things the Naperville Woman's Club has always tried to do."

An Empty Bowls fundraiser will benefit local food pantries. Art fair patrons can purchase an empty bowl, created and sold by artists from Warrenville's ClaySpace, a nonprofit organization that provides ceramic studio space and classes to the community.

A silent auction will feature work donated by participating artists and will continue until 3 p.m. Sunday. Auction proceeds also will go to food pantries, such as Loaves and Fishes, Calvary Church Food Pantry and St. Thomas the Apostle Pantry.

"The fair has raised money for charitable organizations since it was started," Lang said.

Musical performances will run both days of the festival and will include Running Fox Bluegrass, the Project Inclusion Ensemble from the Chicago Sinfonietta and the Naperville Chorus.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

A Petite Picassos area will feature crafts and art activities for children.

It is estimated that between 3,000 and 4,000 people will come out for the event, where Lang said they can see artwork they might not otherwise have the chance to.

"There's beautiful works of art people wouldn't see unless they came to the show," she said. "I think art crosses all different levels of education and beauty, and it kind of transcends all different boundaries."

Marie Gnesda is the founding president and a resident artist of ClaySpace. This will be her first year judging the art fair, but it's definitely not her first experience with art.

Gnesda has been creating ceramic pieces since she was 16 years old, after a high school class caught her attention.

"It's a hobby you can have your whole lifetime," she said. "Once I got my hands in clay, I just couldn't stop."

The ceramic artist said the judges will look at the artistic quality of the piece, how the piece is finished, the professionalism of the booth and creativity.

"It's a well-respected show in the country," she said. "They have incredible artists from all over the country. It's exciting to see the new art."

It's very important that shows like the Fine Art Fair promote art in communities, Gnesda said.

"If we don't have beauty, I think our life becomes boring," she said. "We need art to inspire."

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