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updated: 3/12/2018 10:11 PM

Immanuel School-Batavia celebrates Lutheran Schools Week

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  • McKinley Van, a fourth-grader at Immanuel School-Batavia, represents the great state of South Dakota during teacher Bill Moser's "Parade of States" program for the 28th annual Lutheran Schools Week.

    McKinley Van, a fourth-grader at Immanuel School-Batavia, represents the great state of South Dakota during teacher Bill Moser's "Parade of States" program for the 28th annual Lutheran Schools Week.
    Courtesy of Megan Popp

 
Submitted by Jeanette Dall

The halls and classrooms of Immanuel Lutheran School in Batavia seemed to vibrate with electric energy.

And depending upon which day you visited, you could see students and teachers wearing pajamas or their very dressiest outfits.

What was the cause of all this enthusiasm and excitement? Immanuel was celebrating its 28th annual Lutheran Schools Week. Each day featured a different fun and educational event.

Uncle Sam (aka fourth-grade teacher Bill Moser) introduced the 21 participants in the Parade of States. Each fourth-grade student chose their favorite state and researched its resources, history, and a famous person from the state.

Then they built floats presenting what they had learned and dressed as the famous native of their state. Aaron Rodgers, Evel Knievel, and Helen Keller all made their appearance.

The hallway walls were covered with student art work. Everything from scary purple octopi to gospel messages written in Chinese grabbed the attention of the passer-by.

Middle schoolers researched artists with their various forms and styles of art. They presented their findings at the Fine Arts Fair.

"How did she do that when she was blind and deaf? It must be really hard to do anything when you can't see or hear."

These were some of the comments from students as they watched Caitlin Dunlap of Historical Perspectives for Children become Helen Keller.

Caitlin was so convincing in the role that the audience forgot that she wasn't really Helen. Helen's story helps the children understand and accept the different ways people do the same things.

The final event of Lutheran Schools Week was a talent show. Students in third to eighth grade shared vocal and instrumental solos, magic, and even roller skating performances.

The week also included service trips to Feed My Starving Children, an orchestra concert, a book fair, and visiting day with a celebration chapel service and lunch.

Principal Donna Laughlin said, "The purpose of Lutheran Schools Week is mainly to celebrate our ministry of Christian education. It gives us an opportunity to highlight what we do and it helps those in the community to get to know us better."

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