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posted: 10/25/2010 1:00 AM

What do townships have in common?

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In an Oct. 15 article, "Husband of township official arrested on battery charge," it seems like the usual squabble gone bad among grass-roots politicians. Distasteful at its best. But it bodes a far more sinister event than a disagreement between opposing interests.

It is in fact the norm in a form of government that has outlived its original concept purpose, especially in areas where major municipal growth has occurred. How unfortunate for the taxpayer. In the current economy, caution with expenditure of funds should occur before money is spent.

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And who is getting rich on the backs of the taxpayers? How much has Grafton Township paid to the attorneys giving what can only be speculated to be self-serving advise to the local elected officials?

In Wheatland Township, significantly more than the yearly budgeted amount has already been paid to the $190-plus-an-hour attorney. Even the yearly budgeted amount took a dramatic increase when the new attorney was hired by the township supervisor.

But, she "wrote the book on township government" claimed the supervisor when questioned by citizens and some board members. Funny, I thought that was the job of legislators. Welcome to a new kind of snake oil salesman on the prairie. There's more in common than money and disagreement in Wheatland and Grafton townships.

Georgann Cole Karantonis

Naperville

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