Facebook like page thumb

Daily Archive : Monday October 15, 2012

News

  •  
    Teacher Kate Glass speaks with students taking part in the Literacy Lab at Buffalo Grove High School. The new program involves student tutors working with their peers to help make them better writers.

    Buffalo Grove students tutor peers in new Literacy Lab

    Student tutors at Buffalo Grove High School are helping their peers improve their writing skills outside the traditional English curriculum, focusing on literacy across all subjects through a new program launched this year. The Literacy Lab, started by teachers Heidi Haen and Kate Glass, is a classroom in the library where students can come for help with writing projects ranging from menu...

  •  
    Republican Sidney Mathias, left, opposes Democrat Carol Sente in the 59th State House District for the 2012 General Election.

    Mathias, Sente both proclaim independence from party

    Both candidates for the newly created 59th Representative District are touting their political independence. And both are saying that they have either openly broke with leadership or taken steps that went against the grain even though both candidates get much of their funding from their political parties.

  •  

    D300 strike vote may have little impact on continuing talks

    Union leaders in Community Unit District 300 say they hope the overwhelming results of Sunday's strike vote will lead to greater compromise on the part of the school board in upcoming negotiations. But district leaders doubt much will change. "My gut feeling is that it won't change things," Joe Stevens, school board president said. "I see it as an understandable step that they felt they needed to...

  •  
    Daniel Baker

    Baker again declared fit, trial to start Tuesday

    Though he believes Daniel Baker to have "flights of fancy" and "significant mental health issues," Lake County Associate Judge Daniel Shanes declared the Deerfield man accused of killing his girlfriend's mother to be an intelligent and precocious individual who is mentally fit to stand trial. Baker, 24, has waived a jury trial, meaning Shanes alone will decide Baker's innocence or guilt in the...

  •  
    Adam Moring

    Family of Cary man killed in Phoenix shocked

    A Chicago man has been arrested in Phoenix in the baseball bat killing of his ex-wife's boyfriend, Adam Moring, formerly of Cary and Round Lake. Authorities allege David Walker flew to Phoenix last week and repeatedly hit Moring in the head with the bat. Moring's family is making funeral arrangements.

  •  
    Police block off Lombard Avenue in Addison near Addison Trail High School Monday night after shots were fired a half-mile west of the school.

    Addison police shoot, kill man who fired at officers

    A man shot by Addison police after he fired on them has died, authorities said Tuesday.George R. Scoville, 47, was killed after he fired his weapon numerous times at officers and deputies who were investigating a hit-and-run crash. Scoville was taken to Glen Oaks Hospital where he was pronounced dead.

  •  
    First Lady Michelle Obama already has mailed her absentee ballot and President Obama plans to vote in person in Illinois on Oct. 25.

    Obama, first lady plan to vote early for Nov. 6

    President Barack Obama won't be posing for any photos in the voting booth on Election Day — he's casting his ballot early. Obama said on Twitter today that he intended to vote early in person in Illinois on Oct. 25 — three days after the final presidential debate. "If your state has early voting, join me," Obama said on Twitter, directing followers to a link with more information...

  •  
    Gov. Pat Quinn wants to close Tamms Correctional Center, Illinois’ only super-maximum-security prison, and other facilities.

    Democrats join call to drop state prison closures

    A handful of Democratic lawmakers turned up the heat on Gov. Pat Quinn on Monday, urging him to drop his plan to close some Illinois prisons and vowing to restore money to run them when legislators return to Springfield next month.

  •  
    A closeup view of a microscope taking a look at a slide meningitis causing fungus Exserohilum rostratum at the Mycotic lab at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta.

    Chicago doctor expects more meningitis cases

    A Chicago doctor who has done spinal taps on two patients to rule out fungal meningitis says he expects to see more cases in Illinois as testing continues. Northwestern emergency medicine Dr. Rahul Khare says the patients he tested were frightened, but the tests showed nothing abnormal. The patients had received back pain injections of a steroid linked to an outbreak of deadly meningitis.

  •  
    Asian carp are poised to invade the Great Lakes, where scientists say they could out-compete native fish for food.

    Asian carp processing plant could open in month

    The Asian carp plant will be in the 700-resident Grafton, about 40 miles northeast of St. Louis. The plant will harvest the invasive, ecologically threatening species from two of the nation's biggest inland rivers that converge nearby.

  •  
    Brian Dennehy played former anarchist Larry Slade opposite Nathan Lane's Theodore “Hickey” Hickman” in Goodman Theatre's epic production of “The Iceman Cometh.”

    Goodman, Chicago Shakespeare theater dominate 44th annual equity Jeff Awards

    Suburban theaters including Marriott in Lincolnshire and Drury Lane in Oak Brook failed to win any major awards at Monday's 44th annual Equity Jeff Awards Ceremony in Oak Brook. Goodman Theatre proved a formidable contender winning multiple Jeffs for its epic revival of Eugene O'Neill's “The Iceman Cometh.” Director Gary Griffin's production of Stephen Sondheim's “Follies”...

  •  
    Jim Oberweis, left, opposes Corrine Pierog in the 25th Senate District for the 2012 General Election.

    Oberweis, Pierog differ on term limits for legislators

    Corinne Pierog and Jim Oberweis, state Senate candidates in the 25th District, have different takes on whether allowing legislators serve for years and years is good for the people. Oberweis, the Sugar Grove Republican, has vowed to serve no more than eight years. Pierog, a Democrat from St. Charles, doesn't dispute that longtime politicians might become beholden to contributors and lobbyists.

  •  

    U-46, education assistants reach deal

    The Elgin Area School District U-46 school board approved a contract for paraprofessionals in the district, but another bargaining team is headed back to the negotiating table with a few outstanding issues. The District U046 Transportation Union, DUTU will hold a general membership meeting on Thursday.

  •  
    David Harris, left, and Curt Renz are running for the 53rd House District seat.

    District 53 hopefuls support shifting pension payments to schools

    State Rep. David Harris acknowledges that his support for shifting pension responsibilities to suburban school districts sets him apart from most fellow Republicans in the Illinois legislature. But it's one area on which he and the Democrat running against him for the 53rd House district, Curt Renz, completely agree.

  •  
    Elburn President Dave Anderson

    No Elburn Station vote until bridge is built

    The Elburn village board won't vote on annexing and developing ShoDeen Homes' large Elburn Station project until after the Anderson Road extension and bridge is built. The board voted 4-3 to table the vote Monday night, with President Dave Anderson casting the tiebreaker. "We did not have enough votes to pass (the annexation agreement)," said Anderson, who favors the development.

  •  
    St. Charles aldermen, in a preliminary vote, set a flat property tax levy for next year. But with declining home values, that means taxes will still increase for many property owners.

    St. Charles moving toward flat tax levy, but taxes would increase

    St. Charles aldermen voted Monday night to keep the city's property tax levy flat. But the move would actually see property tax bills increase for most city residents.

  •  

    Glenbard North, East graduation site decision tabled

    The school year has already begun, but students and families at Glenbard North and East high schools still don't know exactly where it will end — that is, where graduation ceremonies will be held. Officials at Glenbard High School District 87 have proposed moving commencement ceremonies to the Sears Centre in Hoffman Estates for a year while renovations take place at the current site of...

  •  

    Wheeling might take over Wolf Road

    The Wheeling village board will consider taking over Wolf Road from Milwaukee Avenue south to Manchester Drive from the state in exchange for getting the 8,000 feet widened and rehabilitated. The Illinois Department of Transportation is trying to persuade local governments to take over ownership and maintenance of major roads, Village Manager Jon Sfondilis told the board Monday night.

  •  
    Lynn Mitchell of Sugar Grove waits to cross Farnsworth Avenue in Aurora on the Illinois Prairie Path. Two lighted signs will be installed at the crossing after Mitchell pushed for safety improvements.

    DuPage towns try to make Prairie Path street crossings safer

    The Illinois Prairie Path has been spanning the western suburbs for 50 years, but that doesn't stop path users, traffic engineers and police from seeking new ways to make the trail safer where it crosses busy streets. Police in several towns say accidents at Prairie Path intersections are exceedingly rare, but taking another look at ways to increase safety never hurts.

  •  
    William Cellini

    Judge agrees to recommend prisons for Cellini

    A judge in Chicago has agreed to recommend that a convicted Springfield businessman serve his year prison sentence for corruption in facilities in either Montgomery, Ala., or Fort Worth, Texas.

  •  

    JetBlue passenger working toward plea agreement

    A Chicago man accused of groping a pregnant woman on a JetBlue flight and ignoring crew instructions appears headed toward a plea agreement.

  •  

    Nonprofit hopes to raise awareness for World Food Day

    A Chicago-based nonprofit is asking people to spend Wednesday educating themselves about problems of hunger afflicting people on an international scale for World Food Day.

  •  
    A member of the media on MOnday moves equipment outside the media filing center in preparation for tonight’s presidential at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y.

    Eyes are on the voters in town hall-style debates

    Tonight's town hall presidential debate will bring President Barack Obama and his Republican rival Mitt Romney to Hofstra University on New York's Long Island to take questions from undecided voters selected by the Gallup polling company.

  •  
    Local preservationists have been given six months to come up with a plan to restore a landmark house at Churchill Woods Forest Preserve near Glen Ellyn.

    Forest hopefuls differ on historic Glen Ellyn-area home

    Both DuPage Forest Preserve Commission candidates hoping to represent the district that includes Churchill Woods Forest Preserve have different opinions about how to save a landmark structure there. Republican Tim Whelan of Wheaton says the forest preserve district should lead the charge to restore the McKee house — even if it means spending district money to do it. But Whelan's opponent in...

  •  

    Des Plaines man charged with sexual assault

    Cook County Judge Jill Cerone Marisie set bail at $300,000 for a Des Plaines man charged with sexually molesting a teenage girl. Eduardo Contreras, 45, could face from four to 15 years in prison if he's convicted of criminal sexual assault.

  •  
    Aneta Marsek

    Volo mother remains hospitalized in Wisconsin

    A missing Volo woman who was the subject of a nationwide search said she needed to "get away" and spent six days living out of her SUV with her two young children in a secluded area of the Wisconsin Dells, authorities said Monday. Aneta Marsek, 33, remains in a mental health hospital in Wisconsin after she turned herself into authorities Sunday, but her two children are safe at home, Lake County...

  •  

    Car hits building in Crystal Lake

    A Fox River Grove man received only minor injuries after his vehicle struck a building in Crystal Lake Monday afternoon, authorities said. Emergency crews from Crystal Lake Fire Rescue and Crystal Lake Police Department responded at 12:46 p.m. to the scene of the crash near Crystal Lake Plaza, 6500 Northwest Hwy., near Route 14 and Virginia Road.

  •  
    Workers sets up chairs off the set of Tuesday’s presidential debate between Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney and President Barack Obama on Monday at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y.

    Obama embraces economic record in new commercial

    With the economy showing some signs of improvement three weeks before Election Day, President Barack Obama on Monday laid down a full embrace of the economic record many Republicans say is his biggest weakness.

  •  
    Thomas Castillo

    Only subtleties separate DuPage County Board District 1 hopefuls on pay, pensions

    With all seats up for election Nov. 6 on theDuPage County Board, hopefuls in several districts differ on whether board members' annual $50,000 pay and publicly funded pensions are fair. In District 1, the three Republicans and three Democrats running for three seats agree the pay is fair and are mostly in-step on pensions. But there are subtle differences that explain their positions.

  •  
    Pakistani students sing as they hold pictures of 14-year-old schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, who was shot last Tuesday by the Taliban for speaking out in support of education for women, during a tribute at the Pakistani Embassy in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, Monday.

    Pakistani girl shot by Taliban now in UK for care

    A teenage Pakistani activist shot in the head by the Taliban arrived in Britain on Monday to receive specialized medical care and protection from follow-up attacks threatened by the militants.

  •  
    Khalid Sheikh Mohammed is seen in this courtroom sketch during a recess at his Military Commissions pretrial hearing in the Guantanamo Bay U.S. Naval Base in Cuba on Monday.

    Gitmo detainees behave this time at 9/11 hearing

    There were no rants this time, no ignoring the judge or getting out of their seats to pray — just one scornful remark from the professed mastermind of the Sept. 11 attacks as a weeklong pretrial hearing began for five Guantanamo Bay detainees.

  •  
    Dave Starr and his wife Karen Starr, of Wildwood, Mo., look at the plaque dedicated to his sister Dana Petersen’s memory Monday at Marion Jordan School in Palatine. Petersen was the school’s principal from 2001 to 2011.

    Patio dedicated to former principal at Palatine school

    More than 70 people attended a dedication for the Dana Petersen Patio at Marion Jordan School in Palatine Monday. During her 10 years as principal of the school, Petersen had a vision to make the overgrown, underutilized courtyard what it is now, with seating for students, a decorative brick path and a variety of flowers and plants. Petersen died in June 2011 after a battle with cancer.

  •  
    Shaker Masri

    Would-be terrorist allowed to see dying mom

    An attorney for a Chicago man awaiting sentencing on terrorism-related charges says his client was allowed to leave jail to visit his ailing mother. Shaker Masri was arrested in 2010 after the FBI exposed his plot to attend a Somali training camp to become a suicide bomber.

  •  
    Ron Drake, candidate for Arlington Heights village president

    Former Phoenix-area mayor wants to lead Arlington Heights

    Ron Drake, an Arlington Heights resident who formerly led a Phoenix suburb as its mayor, hopes to do the same in his current hometown. Drake, 54, said Monday he will be running for Arlington Heights village president in the April 2013 consolidated election.

  •  
    Dan Bailey

    DuPage board Dist. 4 hopefuls offer different ideas on fair pay

    Two Republican incumbents, a Republican newcomer and two Democratic hopefuls for DuPage County Board District 4 offer a variety of ideas on what constitutes fair pay for the county board. While most agree pensions are a bad idea, their views on the $50,000 annual salary differ.

  •  
    The New England Compounding Center in Framingham, Mass., and its practices are under scrutiny as investigators try to determine how a steroid solution supplied by the pharmacy apparently became contaminated with a fungus.

    FDA: Pharmacy’s other drugs may be causing illness

    Two more drugs from a specialty pharmacy linked to a meningitis outbreak are now being investigated, U.S. health officials said, as they urged doctors to contact patients who got any kind of injection from the company.

  •  
    Felix Baumgartner jumps from his capsule more than 24 miles up Sunday.

    Jump from 24-miles high provides collective moment

    Felix Baumgartner stood poised in the open hatch of a capsule suspended above Earth, wondering if he would make it back alive. Twenty four miles below him, millions of people were right there with him, watching on the Internet and marveling at the wonder of the moment.

  •  
    Michael McGue

    Millburn District 24 teachers join union during contract talks

    Millburn Elementary District 24's status as being one of the few Lake County school systems without union teachers has changed. Lake County Federation of Teachers President Michael McGue said Monday that about 100 Millburn instructors signed cards in favor of unionization late last week in the middle of talks for a new contract.

  •  

    Prospect Hts. race raises funds for epilepsy research

    The 4th annual Paul's Run for Epilepsy will start at 9 a.m. Sunday, Oct. 21, at Gary Morava Recreation Center, 110 W. Camp McDonald Road, Prospect Heights. Besides the 5K run/walk there will be an epilepsy and health and wellness fair and a 1-mile run and other races for youngsters.

  •  

    Northwest suburban police blotter

    Thieves cut a fence at Schmitt's Truck Repair in Elk Grove Village and stole 23 truck tractor tires. Thieves entered the same storage yard another time and stole 20 truck radiators out of an open storage shed. Loss was estimated at $7,400.

  •  
    Brad Schneider, left, and Robert Dold

    Brad Schneider upset about Dold TV ad in 10th District race

    Democratic congressional candidate Brad Schneider is steamed about an opposition commercial he claims takes a comment he made during a debate out of context. Schneider wants Republican incumbent Robert Dold to pull the 30-second TV ad, which debuted last week. "This misleading ad put out by Congressman Dold's campaign takes a remark completely out of context and uses false figures in a blatant...

  •  

    Northwest suburban police blotter

    A male Hispanic, described in his late 40s or early 50s, wearing khaki pants, fleece sweatshirt and skullcap, was seen on a security videotape taking 81 packages of over-the-counter medications worth more than $1,800 in Arlinton Heights. Authorities believe he also stole medications from other stores in Arlington Heights, Rolling Meadows and Palatine.

  •  

    Wauconda Lions host annual dinner

    The Wauconda Lions Club will host its 31st annual Calcutta dinner/raffle on Saturday, Nov. 3, at the Mill Creek Banquets, 333 W. Mill St., Wauconda.

  •  

    Bradbury Festival at Genesee

    Tickets are on sale now to the award-winning Seventh Annual Ray Bradbury Storytelling Festival, "October Country," Oct. 26 at the Genesee Theatre in downtown Waukegan.

  •  

    Food pantry needs donations

    The Fremont Township food pantry is accepting donations of non-perishable food items, paper products, personal products, cleaning supplies, diapers and wipes and cash.

  •  

    False robbery report gets Naperville man ride home, misdemeanor conviction

    Anthony Reyes told police he was robbed at knife point when, actually, he just wanted a ride home. The 21-year-old Naperville man pleaded guilty Friday to attempted disorderly conduct and was sentenced to 60 hours of community service work and a year of court supervision.

  •  

    Tri-Cities police reports
    Christopher A. Brown, 23, of Geneva, was arrested at 2:24 a.m. Sept. 29 at his home, according to a police report. He was charged with battery, resisting arrest, driving under the influence of alcohol, failure to obey a yield or stop sign, and failure to obey a traffic-control device. Police say he tried to avoid arrest by walking away, then pushing away from a police officer; the police officer...

  •  

    Prospect Hts. police plan open house

    The Prospect Heights Police Department invites residents to an open house from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 20. Besides tours of the station, visitors also will have an opportunity to meet police officers, receive information on crime prevention, register bicycles and see police equipment and vehicles.

  •  

    Elgin budget decisions expected to be easier for 2013

    With many of the hard decisions made last year, Elgin City Council members will begin discussing the 2013 budget and the 2013-2017 financial plan on Friday. Council members will hear an update on 2012 revenues as well as expected adjustments to the current-year budget. City Manager Sean Stegall said the meeting will lay the foundation for revenue predictions in 2013 but details for the city's...

  •  
    Robert Theodore

    Fitness trainer arraigned on sex abuse charges involving teen

    A former personal trainer pleaded not guilty Monday to charges he sexually abused a Naperville teen in the hot tub at a Warrenville fitness center, among other locations. Robert Theodore, 60, of Woodridge, was formally arraigned on five counts of aggravated criminal sexual abuse.

  •  

    Group to promote chastity among gays in Louisville

    A group that preaches chastity among gays and lesbians is starting a local chapter in Louisville with the permission of Archbishop Joseph Kurtz. Kurtz says the Connecticut-based group known as Courage has a goal to "promote chaste living" by abstaining from sex outside of a heterosexual marriage.

  •  

    Chicago releases 1st cultural plan since 1986

    Chicago's new cultural plan calls for making arts a core subject at Chicago Public Schools, providing tax incentives for creative industry start-ups and developing a large-scale new festival and permanent festival grounds.

  •  
    Marvin Brown

    Probation for Glendale Heights teens who pelted cars with rocks

    Three Glendale Heights men were sentenced to probation Monday for pelting cars with rocks from a local railroad overpass last month. Eighteen-year-olds Marvin Brown, Rodney King and Raheim Grier each pleaded guilty to vehicular endangerment.

  •  
    Tony Michelassi: 78% attended

    DuPage County Board attendance all over the map

    Four DuPage County Board members miss at least one out of every five board and standing committee meetings, a Daily Herald/Better Government Association analysis shows. The pair with the lowest attendance rates — Michael McMahon and Patrick O'Shea — face questions about their commitment to a position that pays more than $50,000 a year. “I still care about what happens with this...

  •  
    It’s just a construction site now, but come February, hot dog lovers will be able to indulge their cravings at a new Portillo’s at Randall and Bowes roads in Elgin, officials say.

    Portillo’s under construction on Randall in Elgin

    Hot dog lovers, rejoice. The long-awaited Portillo's of Elgin is under construction, and is scheduled to open in February at Randall and Bowes roads, according to Sarosh Saher, senior planner for the city.

  •  

    Charges pending in head-on Sunday crash in St. Charles

    St. Charles police say criminal charges are pending against an Aurora man who was involved a head-on crash Sunday morning. Police said Luis Pina, 45, was taken to Delnor in critical condition and three others had non-life threatening injuries.

  •  
    Arie Friedman, left, opposes Julie Morrison in the 29th Senate District for the 2012 General Election.

    State Senate candidate Friedman defends PAC gift

    Republican state senate candidate Arie Friedman says his donations to a group opposed to abortion rights does not go against his current position on the issue. Friedman, running against Democrat Julie Morrison in the 29th Senate District, contends the cash he gave to Family PAC was because of its stance against changes in U.S. patent law, not abortion.

  •  

    International Children’s Film Festival showcases 44 films

    The first International Children's Film Festival will be Oct. 20 and 21 at the Round Lake Beach Cultural & Civic Center with 44 international films from 19 countries for children ages 2-10.

  •  
    Nicole Sladkov, a seventh-grader at Hawthorn Middle School South in Vernon Hills, was a member of USA National Junior Rhythmic Gymnastics Team, center, that recently won medals in the 2012 Pan American Championships.

    Seventh-grade gymnast takes honors in international competition

    This past September, Nicole Sladkov, a seventh-grader at Hawthorn Middle School South in Vernon Hills, was on the USA National Junior Rhythmic Gymnastics Team that won honors in the 2012 Pan American Championships in Cordoba, Argentina.

  •  
    Kane County State’s Attorney Joe McMahon

    Kane prosecutors: Bullying not acceptable

    The Kane County State's Attorney's Office is taking its anti-bullying program on the road. It recently finished a three-part seminar for students, teachers and staff at an East Dundee private school and is in the process of completing a program at South Elgin High School. The principal at Immanuel Lutheran School said he would give the program a B-plus.

  •  
    Every day through November, observers at Greene Valley Forest Preserve document the migrating hawks, eagles, falcons and vultures.

    October is a good time to maximize your birding

    Too busy for birding? Lately it has felt that way for our Jeff Reiter. In September he attended only two organized bird walk but plans to make amends in October. There is so much to see this month, including brown creepers, fox sparrows and, yes, even yellow-bellied sapsuckers. He says he'll feel like a sapsucker if he misses any more of the autumn spectacle now upon us.

  •  

    Northwest suburban police blotter

    A Chicago man was charged Oct. 11 in Palatine with felony theft after plainclothes officers conducting surveillance in the Gateway Center parking garage located at 251 W. Colfax, in response to a recent rash of catalytic converter thefts saw the man crawl underneath a 2008 Lexus sport utility vehicle and attempt to remove the catalytic converter.

  •  
    Philip Graham Ryken Wheaton College

    Wheaton College celebrates connections to women Christian leaders

    "Great heavens, what remarkable women are to be found among these Christians!" Wheaton College President Philip Graham Ryken applies the words of Libianios to women with ties to the college who are contemporary Christian leaders.

  •  
    Dr. Brian Chicoine, Medical Director of Advocate Lutheran General Hospitals Adult Down Syndrome Center, right, greets patients Paul Franklin, left, and Jill Sowins, center, during the open house.

    Adult Down syndrome center a passion, and ‘a blessing’

    What started 20 years ago with Dr. Brian Chicoine seeing adults with Down syndrome two mornings a week has evolved into the Adult Down Syndrome Center in Park Ridge, the only one of its kind in the Midwest. It is offered by Advocate Lutheran General Hospital and its medical group. "It's a passion of Brian's," says Anthony Armada, president of Lutheran General, "and we consider it a blessing to...

  •  
    Tom Kierna

    Cary trustee, incumbent running for village president

    A Cary trustee who ran on a platform of bringing transparency to the village board has set his sights on the highest office in town. Trustee Bruce Kaplan says he will take on incumbent Tom Kierna in the village president race next spring. Kierna, who has been mayor for one term, says he's running again.

  •  
    Operating paratransit buses, like this hybrid that operates in Elgin and Schaumburg, is expensive.

    Limo service? RTA chairman laments cost of paratransit

    Regional Transportation Authority Chairman John S. Gates Jr. says paratransit loses "a ton of money" each year. And as ridership goes up for what he says is like a "limousine service," the agency will lose even more. "It's hugely expensive, but it's something we have to do. It's the law. It's a civil right,” he said.

  •  

    Pizza Hut rethinks presidential debate stunt

    Pizza Hut is rethinking its contest daring people to ask "Sausage or Pepperoni?" at the presidential debate Tuesday. After the stunt triggered backlash last week, the company says it's moving the promotion online, where a contestant will be randomly selected to win free pizza for life.

  •  
    A giant eyeball that washed ashore and was found by a man walking the beach in Pompano Beach, Fla. on Wednesday likely came from a swordfish, experts say.

    Giant eyeball on Fla. beach may be from swordfish

    State experts say a giant eyeball that washed up on a Florida beach last week likely came from a swordfish. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission said Monday they based their conclusion on the eyeball's color, size and structure, along with the presence of bone around it. Genetic testing will be done to confirm the identification.

  •  
    Luxembourg’s Foreign Minister Jean Asselborn, left, French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius and German Foreign Minister Guido Westerwelle share a word during a meeting of EU Foreign Ministers in Luxembourg on Monday. Britain, Germany and France say they expect the European Union to approve even tougher sanctions on Iran to prevent it from developing nuclear weapons.

    EU puts new sanctions on Iran for nuclear program

    The European Union, concerned by what it called Iran's refusal to come clean on its nuclear program, imposed a new range of sanctions Monday intended to hit the country's treasury and increase pressure on its Islamic regime. A leading European satellite provider, meanwhile, took 19 Iranian television and radio broadcasters off the air Monday — a cutoff due to earlier sanctions. The move...

  •  
    Russian ambassador Andrey Avetisyan announces that Russia is appealing to the Afghan authorities to provide information on 200 Soviet troops listed as missing since Soviet forces ended their occupation of Afghanistan in 1989 during a press conference at the Russian embassy in Kabul, Afghanistan, Monday.

    Russia asks Afghanistan for help with Soviet MIAs

    Russia is appealing to the Afghan authorities and the public to provide information on more than 200 Soviet troops — including 30-40 who may still be alive — listed as missing since Soviet forces ended their occupation of Afghanistan in 1989.

  •  

    Probe: Pilots of crashed Russian plane were drunk

    Russia's investigative agency says both the pilots of a plane that crashed last month in Russia's far east, killing 10 people, were drunk. The Investigative Committee said Monday that a forensic study found the first pilot of the local flight was lightly intoxicated and his co-pilot was moderately intoxicated when their An-28 slammed into a forest on the Kamchatka Peninsula on Sept. 12.

  •  
    The first hearing of the trial for the Jan. 13 tragedy where 32 people died after the luxury cruise Costa Concordia was forced to evacuate some 4,200 passengers as it hit a rock while passing too close to the Giglio Island is taking place in Monday. Captain Francesco Schettino, who was blamed for both the accident and for leaving the ship before the passengers, is scheduled to attend the hearing.

    Packed court as shipwreck captain hears evidence

    The captain of the cruise ship that crashed into an Italian reef appeared in court Monday to hear the evidence against him, while hundreds of passengers who survived the deadly shipwreck and the families of those who died in it showed up just "to look him in the eye." The case of Francesco Schettino, 51, was of such enormous interest that a theater had to be turned into a courtroom in the Tuscan...

  •  

    Governor: 6 aid workers kidnapped in central Niger

    Six aid group employees were abducted from the guesthouse where they were sleeping in a central Niger town, an eyewitness and the provincial governor said Monday. Men in two Toyota pickup trucks pulled up to a guesthouse run by CARE International in the town of Dakoro late Sunday and seized five Nigeriens and a worker from Chad, said Sidi Mohamed, the governor of the Maradi region.

  •  

    HPV shots don’t make girls promiscuous, study says

    Shots that protect against cervical cancer do not make girls promiscuous, according to the first study to compare medical records for vaccinated and unvaccinated girls.

  •  

    Metra fare hike not proposed — but not ruled out

    Chicago's commuter train service has released a budget for 2013 that leaves the door open for fare increases.

  •  

    Head of British legion resigns amid lobbying flap

    The Royal British Legion says its president has resigned in wake of a newspaper sting in which retired senior officers were recorded appearing to offer lobbying services on behalf of defense companies.

  •  

    Yemen: Jetfighter crashes, killing pilot

    Yemen's defense ministry says a Russian-made jetfighter has crashed immediately after takeoff during a training mission, killing its pilot. The ministry's online newspaper said the MiG-21 aircraft crashed Monday inside al-Annad air base in the southern province of Lahj due to technical failure.

  •  
    Cotton farmer Teofilo “Junior” Flores drives his truck along the U.S.-Mexico border fence that passes through his property in Brownsville, Texas. Since 2008, hundreds of landowners on the border have sought fair prices for property that was condemned to make way for the fence, but many of them received initial offers that were far below market value.

    Landowners on border say they were shortchanged

    When the federal government began seizing private land along the U.S.-Mexico border to build a towering fence, Teofilo Flores was offered $1,650 for a slice of his backyard. At first, it seemed like a square deal. But then the cotton grower learned that his neighbor had received 40 times more for a similar piece of land. And another nearby farmer pocketed $1 million in exchange for his...

  •  

    9/11 victims’ families to watch hearings in Cuba

    A military installation in Brooklyn is welcoming families of 9/11 victims this week — to watch pretrial hearings in Cuba for five men charged in the terrorist attacks. The sessions in Guantanamo Bay are closed to the public. But relatives who register can see them on closed-circuit television at Fort Hamilton, a U.S. Army base.

  •  
    David Crawley with a sign for the Bus Watch predator program he is starting in Danville.

    Danville man organizes bus watch

    David Crawley remembers his childhood days when neighbors would look after one another's children to make sure the students made it home safely after school.When he moved into the Holiday Hills neighborhood about a year ago, Crawley said he made a point to go around and meet all his neighbors. He encourages others around the city to do the same.

  •  
    Shawn Lockhart looks at the meningitis-causing fungus Exserohilum rostratum at the mycotic lab at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Friday in Atlanta. The staff and technicians have been working around the clock to confirm cases and inform the public regarding the multistate meningitis outbreak that has resulted in 14 deaths.

    At the CDC, scientists fight to halt a deadly outbreak

    Scattered across the carefully landscaped main campus of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are the staff on the front lines fighting a rare outbreak of fungal meningitis: A scientist in a white lab coat peers through a microscope at fungi on a glass slide. In another room, another researcher uses what looks like a long, pointed eye dropper to suck up DNA samples that will be tested...

  •  
    The New Hampshire Attorney Generals office said Saturday that Elizabeth “Lizzi” Marriott, a 19-year-old University of New Hampshire student who disappeared Tuesday, Oct. 9, is dead, and a man has been charged with second-degree murder.

    Suspect in death of UNH student due in court

    The suspect charged in the killing of a 19-year-old University of New Hampshire student is due to make his first court appearance. Twenty-nine-year-old Seth Mazzaglia, of Dover, is due to be arraigned Monday on second degree murder charges in connection with the death of Elizabeth "Lizzi" Marriott, of Westborough, Mass.

  •  

    Chicago mayor orders audit of parking meter deal

    Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel has ordered an independent audit of the city's 75-year, $1.15 billion parking meter deal.In a news release Monday, Emanuel says he's ordering the audit to make sure that long-term contracts to manage the city's assets are being managed properly.

  •  

    Plainfield man killed walking along Interstate 55

    Illinois State Police officials say a 22-year-old Plainfield man is dead after being struck by a semitrailer and a car while walking along Interstate 55. Authorities say the accident happened Sunday morning on I-55 just north of U.S. Highway 30 near Plainfield. That's about 30 miles southwest of Chicago.

  •  

    Tommy Thompson’s son apologizes for comments

    The son of U.S. Senate candidate Tommy Thompson was caught on video suggesting voters this fall should send President Barack Obama back "to Kenya."Jason Thompson, the son of the former governor, made the comments Sunday during a brunch hosted by the Kenosha County Republican Party.

  •  

    2 tigers moved to Ind. because of tougher Ohio law

    Two tigers are in a new home at a northeastern Indiana animal sanctuary after their Ohio owner says she couldn't meet that state's new law setting stricter requirements for keeping them. The tigers named Delilah and Sammie arrived Sunday at the Black Pine Animal Sanctuary near Albion after a trip from the Tiger Paw rescue center outside Ashland, Ohio.

  •  

    Some Milwaukee area schools lose students

    More than half the school districts in the four-county Milwaukee metro area saw enrollment decreases at the start of this school year.But enrollment is up in some of Wisconsin's largest virtual charter schools.

  •  
    Felix Baumgartner, of Austria, pumps his fist to the crowd after successfully jumping from a space capsule lifted by a helium balloon at a height of just over 128,000 feet above the Earth's surface.

    Weekend in Review: 24-mile dive; debates

    What you might have missed over the weekend: Skydiver manages 24-mile supersonic leap from above Earth's surface; Volo woman, kids found in Wisconsin; fall colors not over yet; Sonya Blade on the ballot in Kane County; Lake in the Hills man killed near U of I; four injured in St. Charles crash; Specter dies; debate prep trumps campaigning; questions and answers on state pension referendum; Cards...

  •  
    Some residents of the Barrington Countryside Fire Protection District could see their home insurance rates rise next year because the Insurance Services Office is proposing a downgrade in its ranking of their fire protection. District officials say they’re working to make changes that might help them avoid the downgrade.

    Barrington fire district’s insurance rating may drop

    Residents of the Barrington Countryside Fire Protection District could see their home insurance premiums rise as a result of a proposed downgrade of their fire protection classification by the Insurance Services Office. The district’s board of trustees will meet Monday night to discuss how to avoid the potential downgrade, brought about largely by changes to the ISO’s methods, not the...

  •  

    Dawn Patrol: Volo mom, kids found; Dist. 300 strike vote

    Volo woman, children found in Wisconsin. District 300 teachers vote to strike if needed. Four hurt in St. Charles crash. Carpentersville cyclocross race, Danada festival both roll on through rain.

  •  
    State Rep. David Harris, left, and Curt Renz, right, candidates for Illinois House District 53.

    53rd District candidates differ on how to create jobs

    Democrat Curt Renz says Illinois should create jobs with projects like high-speed rail, while state Rep. David Harris’ attitude is “get government out of the way.” Renz, a Democrat from Arlington Heights, is challenging Harris for his 53rd District seat in the state House. The district includes parts of Arlington Heights, Des Plaines, Mount Prospect and Prospect Heights.

  •  
    Chris Tillson, of South Elgin, discusses loan options with Elgin Community College financial aid adviser Anita Nelson. Required student loan counseling sessions have resulted in 4 percent fewer students taking out student loans and, overall, 13 percent less being borrowed.

    Students learn to borrow less at ECC, Harper, CLC

    Elgin Community College is requiring students who want college loans to first enroll in a financial aid course. It's one of the efforts at suburban colleges like ECC, Harper College and College of Lake County to reduce the amount of money students borrow. “We talk to students about what they need versus what they want,” Amy Perrin of ECC said.

  •  
    Britta Wilk McKenna of Batavia, a breast cancer survivor, has launched a website to provide support.

    Batavia woman starts breast cancer website with personality

    When Britta Wilk McKenna was diagnosed with breast cancer, she turned to the Internet for information that night. But sites were either just about the facts, and blogs were either outdated or featured "scary" stories. That led her on a journey that has resulted in a new website, one she hopes will provide a "soft landing" place for those who have just received the "hard diagnosis" of breast...

  •  
    Carolyn Lauing-Finzer of Naperville describes herself as fun and eclectic. Here she dons a gourd hat.

    Images: The Week In Pictures
    This edition of The Week In Pictures features a unique storyteller, homecoming events, oktoberfest, Dog-toberfest, fall festivals and colors.

Sports

  •  
    Notre Dame linebacker Manti Te’o, left, celebrates with defensive end Justin Utupo (53) after Notre Dame defeated Stanford 20-13 in overtime Saturday in South Bend, Ind.

    Notre Dame success important for college football

    All those arrogant Notre Dame supporters and obnoxious Fighting Irish detractors are either back or on their way. Good for them, good for us, and good for everyone who values college football. This is terrific for college football because like politics, all college football is local except for Notre Dame. But pockets everywhere care about Notre Dame. When the Irish are championship nominees, votes are cast in high schools, corner saloons and VFW halls.

  •  
    The San Francisco Giants' Brandon Crawford (35), Gregor Blanco (7) and Angel Pagan celebrate at the plate Monday after scoring on a fielding error by St. Louis Cardinals left fielder Matt Holliday on a single by Giants' Marco Scutaro during the fourth inning of Game 2 of the National League championship series in San Francisco.

    Giants beat Cardinals 7-1 in Game 2 to even NLCS

    Marco Scutaro bounced back from Matt Holliday's hard slide by delivering a big hit of his own that helped the San Francisco Giants get their first home win this postseason, 7-1 over St. Louis on Monday night that tied the NL championship series at 1-all. The game got off to a testy start when Holliday barreled into Scutaro at second base to break up a potential double play in the first inning.

  •  

    Monday’s girls volleyball scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Monday's girls volleyball matches, as reported to the Daily Herald.

  •  

    Monday’s girls tennis scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Monday's girls tennis meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

  •  

    Monday’s girls cross country scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Monday's girls cross country meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

  •  

    Larkin downs Zion-Benton

    Olivia Kofie had 14 kills, 2 blocks and 7 digs and Brianna Stewart added 11 kills, 3 blocks, 2 aces and 4 assists Monday night as Larkin's girls volleyball team defeated Zion-Benton 25-21, 15-25, 25-21 in nonconference action in Zion.

  •  

    Bulls go over finer points of rules with league officials

    After Monday's practice, the Bulls met with former NBA referee George Toliver to discuss points of emphasis in how game will be officiated this season. Richard Hamilton and Nazr Mohammed stayed on the court for several minutes, discussing and demonstrating movements on the court for Toliver to explain. Coach Tom Thibodeau and vice president of basketball operations John Paxson also were in the discussion.

  •  

    Girls volleyball / Top 20
    Benet returned to the No. 1 spot in this week's Daily Herald Top 20 girls volleyball rankings, while St. Francis moved up to No. 2 and Glenbard West slipped to No. 3.

  •  
    Mundelein’s Courtney Perreault, left, attacks opposite Round Lake’s Morgan Evins on Monday night at Mundelein.

    Mundelein manages to turn away Round Lake

    How dare visiting Round Lake give Mundelein's volleyball team a hard time on senior night? Especially after the gorgeous pregame ceremony honoring the 12th-graders on the Mustangs' team. Put it this way: The Panthers seemingly dug everything and were on the brink of toppling the Mustangs in two sets. That's right, with Destiny Brown serving and middle blocker Dominique Gonzales putting down the ball, it was 23-18 Round Lake in the second set. And then the Mustangs handed the ball to sophomore Yasmeen Johnson to serve. She didn't fail, and because of it, Mundelein managed a win on senior night, 24-26, 26-24, 25-16.

  •  
    Detroit Tigers pitcher Justin Verlander throws Monday at Comerica Park in Detroit to prepare for his start against the New York Yankees in Game 3 of the American League championship series Tuesday. Detroit leads the series 2-0.

    Verlander the next obstacle for slumping Yankees

    There were times this year when Justin Verlander took the mound while his team was reeling a bit — and the right-hander's presence was Detroit's best shot at snapping out of a momentary funk. Now, the hard-throwing ace is in a different situation. Led by Verlander, the Tigers' rotation has been absolutely terrific this postseason, and his job is simply to keep this remarkable run going against the slumping New York Yankees.

  •  
    St. Francis girls volleyball standout Maddie Haggerty watches her team play from the bench.

    Concussions more prevalent in volleyball

    When people hear the word concussion, football is the first sport to come to mind. With good reason, given the high-contact nature of the game. Volleyball, though, isn't immune

  •  
    Barrington softball coach Perry Peterson, here directing the action in a state quarterfinal game in 2007, has become the youngest member to gain inclusion in the Illinois Coaches Assocation Hall of Fame.

    Barrington’s Peterson punches early ticket to coaching Hall of Fame

    Perry Peterson calls coaching softball at Barrington High School an amazing opportunity. He sure has had an amazing run. Only 43 years old, Peterson will be inducted into the Illinois Coaches Association Hall of Fame in February of 2013. Peterson, whose 619-150 record in 21 years ranks him eighth on the all-time Illinois list for most wins, is the youngest coach to reach the hall.

  •  
    Jeff Otterby, a sixth-grade social studies teacher at Haines Middle School in St. Charles, was one of the NFL replacement refs. Here Otterby keeps a close eye on Indianapolis Colts quarterback Andrew Luck.

    St. Charles teacher enjoys time as NFL replacement ref

    This is a story about a middle school teacher. Before you put down your newspaper or click to another on-line website, please give me a chance to explain.

  •  
    St. Edward senior Johnny Shepherd celebrates his goal over Elgin Academy in the regional semifinals last week. The Green Wave take on Genoa-Kingston in today’s 4:30 p.m. sectional semifinal at Wedgebury Soccer Complex in Rockford.

    St. Edward soccer team reaching for new heights

    Fall sports accolades at St. Edward High School have not gone the way of the boys soccer team in recent years. In fact, while the Green Wave's girls volleyball and football teams have seen some postseason success in recent years, only once in the 22-year history of the boys soccer program has a postseason plaque gone to St. Edward. Make that twice.

  •  

    Boys soccer/Top 20
    Naperville Central, Naperville North and Benet hold the top three spots in the most recent rankings of boys soccer teams in the area.

  •  

    Football: Top 20 rankings
    Glenbard West, Batavia and Cary-Grove have the top three spots in the Daily Herald's most recent ranking of the top high school football teams in the area.

  •  
    Bulls small forward Luol Deng looks for teammates as he drives up court Tuesday in the fifth game of the Eastern Conference first-round series at the United Center in Chicago.

    Bulls still trying to find comfort level
    A week ago, Bulls coach Tom Thibodeau talked about the early preseason contests providing a baseline for where the team stood. Now, after three games and two losses, we know the Bulls' starting point is more basement-level. But there's another chance to make strides on Tuesday against Milwaukee.

  •  
    Officials break up a fight between the Bears and the Detroit Lions in last season’s game at Soldier Field.

    No love lost between Bears, Lions

    The Bears-Lions rivalry has developed a bit of an edge. From 2005-10 the Bears dominated, winning 10 of 12 meetings with Detroit, and 5 of those victories were by 14 points or more. But last year the series became more competitive — and more than a little chippy. More of the same is expected Monday night at Soldier Field. Last season the Bears lost 24-13 in Detroit on a Monday night in Week 5. But five weeks later they got payback with a 37-13 victory at home.

  •  
    Tight end Brody Eldridge, front, shown here playing for the Colts, signed a one-year contract with the Bears on Monday.

    Bears’ Bennett eager to get back in action

    After putting running back Kahlil Bell on the inactive list for the Jacksonville game, the Bears waived the third-stringer Monday and signed tight end Brody Eldridge to a one-year contract.

  •  

    Soccer: Sectional scouting, Northwest

    Here's a look at the boys soccer postseason from the perspective of teams in the Mid-Suburban League plus St. Viator, Maine West and Leyden.

  •  
    Dallas Cowboys running back Felix Jones, right, rushes past Baltimore Ravens defenders Ray Lewis, left, and Jimmy Smith Sunday during the second half in Baltimore.

    Ravens LB Lewis, CB Webb lost for year

    Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis will miss the remainder of the season with an arm injury, an enormous blow to an already depleted defense that has uncharacteristically struggled this year. Lewis tore his right triceps during Sunday's 31-29 victory over Dallas. "Ray in the locker room afterward, we didn't know (the extent of the injury) but he was worried about it," Ravens coach John Harbaugh said Monday. "He said some things about his faith. He said some things that I'll never forget."

  •  
    Cincinnati Reds manager Dusty Baker smiles Monday during a news conference with team owner Bob Castellini, left, and general manager Walt Jocketty where the Reds announced Baker’s contract had been extended for two more seasons.

    Reds extend manager Dusty Baker’s deal for 2 years

    Reds owner Bob Castellini couldn't imagine Dusty Baker leaving. The 63-year-old manager got a two-year contract extension Monday, giving him another chance to take Cincinnati deep into the playoffs. They've been there twice in the last three years, failing both times to get past the division series. "It's very much the same contract and very much the same thing for all of us up here: There's work left to be done," Baker said. "I didn't want to leave on a note that we still have work to do.

  •  
    NHL Players Association executive director Donald Fehr and his negotiating team will resume talks Tuesday in Toronto with league officials. Little progress was reported from last week's meetings.

    NHL labor talks to resume in Toronto

    The NHL and its locked-out players will resume negotiations Tuesday in Toronto after a four-day break following two days of meetings last week. The announcement Monday comes on the same day players missed their first scheduled paycheck of the regular season. The NHL has called off 82 games through Oct. 24 — the first two weeks of the season. More cancellations likely will be made soon if a deal isn't reached.

  •  
    Marlon Moore

    NIU defensive back Moore grabs top honors

    orthern Illinois cornerback Marlon Moore, a true freshman from Mobile, Ala., was named Mid-American Conference West Division Defensive Player of the Week, league officials announced Monday. Moore earned the honor after intercepting 2 passes and making 5 tackles (4 solo) Saturday in NIU's 45-3 win over Buffalo at Huskie Stadium. He picked off passes on successive drives in the third quarter as the Northern Illinois defense held an opponent without a touchdown for the first time in 22 games (since Nov. 26, 2010).

  •  

    Loyola men’s basketball tickets on sale now

    Single-game tickets for the 2012-13 Loyola University Chicago men's basketball season are now on sale. Loyola opens the regular season Nov. 9 when it hosts Toledo at Joseph J. Gentile Arena.

  •  

    Mike North video: Is the coach going soft?

    Washington Redskin quarterback, RG3 played a great game even though Mike Ditka thought he should sit out a week. Seattle Seahawks' Pete Carroll comes around as a head coach, and the San Diego Chargers Philip Rivers better get it done tonight if he wants to be considered an elite quarterback.

  •  
    Green Bay Packers’ Tom Crabtree makes a 48-yard touchdown reception against the Houston Texans during the fourth quarter Sunday in Houston. The Packers won 42-24.

    Rodgers throws 6 TDs in Packers’ rout of Houston

    Aaron Rodgers and the Green Bay Packers finally put it all together. The reigning MVP set a career high and tied a franchise record with six touchdown passes and the Packers played their best game of their so far inconsistent season, beating previously unbeaten Houston 42-24 on Sunday night.

  •  

    AHL players getting plenty of attention

    Blackhawks president John McDonough paid a visit to Rockford recently to watch a practice. Before McDonough left, he addressed the team with a simple message. “It was just a quick simple message of good luck, play hard and the spotlight is on you guys right now — not only as individuals but as a league, and to take advantage of it,” said Rockford general manager Mark Bernard.

  •  
    St. Louis Cardinals’ Jon Jay (19) and Matt Holliday celebrate after Game 1 of baseball’s National League championship series against the San Francisco Giants Sunday in San Francisco. The Cardinals won 6-4.

    Beltran, Freese hit 2-run HRs as Cards beat Giants

    SAN FRANCISCO — This time, Carlos Beltran, David Freese and the St. Louis Cardinals took a six-run lead — and held onto it, barely.Beltran and Freese hit two-run homers and these wild, wild-card Cardinals beat the San Francisco Giants 6-4 on Sunday night in Game 1 of the NL championship series.The defending World Series champions took an early 6-0 cushion and made it stand up. Only two nights earlier, the Cardinals came back from a 6-0 deficit, using a four-run rally in the ninth inning at Washington in the deciding Game 5 of the division series.The St. Louis bullpen delivered with 5 1-3 scoreless innings after starter Lance Lynn was chased. Edward Mujica, the fifth St. Louis pitcher, struck out the side in order in the seventh for the win. Jason Motte finished for his second save of the postseason.The Cardinals gave first-year manager Mike Matheny a win against his former club.Matheny’s crew hardly looked road weary after a cross-country trip. The Giants dropped to 0-3 at home so far during these playoffs, outscored 20-6 at AT&T Park.Game 2 in the best-of-seven series is Monday night. Chris Carpenter pitches for the Cardinals against Ryan Vogelsong.This is the first time the previous two World Series winners are facing off in the postseason since the 1958 World Series between the Braves and Yankees.Beltran’s fourth-inning drive into the seats in left-center chased San Francisco starter Madison Bumgarner, who has been a far cry from the impressive pitcher he was during the 2010 World Series run. It was Beltran’s 14th career postseason home run and third this October.Beltran spent the second half of the 2011 season with San Francisco after a trade from the Mets, but the Giants missed the playoffs last fall a year after the capturing an improbable championship. The orange towel-waving sellout crowd of 42,534 let him have it with boos at every opportunity — during pregame introductions and each time he stepped into the batter’s box.Both teams were well rested a day after a rough night of travel. The Giants barely beat the Cardinals to the Bay Area early Saturday after they were delayed three hours on the tarmac in Cincinnati on Friday night — to refuel and for a mechanical problem after waiting out the Cardinals-Nationals game to know where they were headed next.Matheny stuck with the same winning lineup that he sent out for Game 5, and some of the same faces came through again.Daniel Descalso, who hit a tying, two-out single in Friday’s 9-7 win, added two more hits with a double.Descalso hit a one-out double in the fourth, then rookie Pete Kozma drove him home with a double of his own. In the ninth inning Friday, Kozma followed Descalso with a go-ahead, two-run single.Descalso shined playing in his native Northern California. He spends his offseasons in San Francisco’s Marina district.St. Louis 18-game winner Lynn didn’t allow a hit until Marco Scutaro’s single to left leading off the fourth. Hunter Pence singled two outs later and Brandon Belt drove him home with a single. Gregor Blanco followed with a two-run triple, then Brandon Crawford hit an RBI double. Pinch hitter Aubrey Huff — a 2010 postseason star now in a diminished role — drew a walk to cheers of “Aubrey! Aubrey!”And, just like that, Lynn was done. Bumgarner and Lynn each lasted only 3 2-3 innings. That made for a long night on both bullpens.The pressure is now on for the Giants not to fall behind 2-0 at home again. They lost the first two games of their division series here to the Reds last weekend before winning three in a row at Cincinnati. They went 48-33 at AT&T Park this season.Bumgarner, a 16-game winner for the NL West champs, lost Game 2 of the division series at home to the Reds exactly a week earlier.

Business

  •  
    Marc Rumaner

    Aurora inventor keeps ideas flowing

    Aurora resident Marc Rumaner, 51, is a graphic designer in Naperville by day. But give him a few minutes, anywhere, and he's inventing. He looks at something and ideas start to click. That's led him to create some household items for Quirky.com that came naturally. For example, he invented the Vine, a device that attaches to the neck of wine or other bottles to keep them from rolling around in the refrigerator.

  •  
    Suzanne Branding

    Hotel plan surfaces in Lake Zurich

    Lake Zurich village board members Monday night gave an informal review of plans for a 130-room hotel with banquet and meeting space at Route 22 and Old Rand Road.

  •  
    Actor Johnny Depp will help run an imprint that will be a home for “authentic, outspoken and visionary” books.

    Depp starting book imprint

    How cool is this: Johnny Depp is going to help run a publishing imprint.Already on the list of books is one by Bob Dylan that aims to set the record straight on the songwriter's enigmatic life and career.

  •  
    Portuguese Secretary of State to the Prime Minister Carlos Moedas is interviewed on the trading floor during the fourth annual Portugal Day at the New York Stock Exchange Monday. U.S. stocks rose, as the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index rebounded from its biggest weekly drop in four months, after American retail sales and Citigroup Inc.’s earnings topped estimates.

    Stocks higher after retail sales improve

    Stocks rose on Monday after a strong gain in retail spending suggested that consumers could be getting more confident about the economy. Bank stocks rose broadly after Citigroup delivered a strong earnings report.

  •  
    Rubbie McCoy, left, a plaintiff in a lawsuit filed against Morgan Stanley, reacts while describing her housing situation during a news conference Monday in New York. With her is attorney Elizabeth Cabraser. McCoy and four other Detroit homeowners have filed a lawsuit claiming Morgan Stanley discriminated against black homeowners and violated federal civil rights laws.

    Morgan Stanley facing discrimination lawsuit

    Morgan Stanley is being accused of discriminating against black homeowners and violating federal civil rights laws by providing strong incentives to a subprime lender to originate mortgages that were likely to go unrepaid.

  •  
    Brad Keselowski makes a pitstop during the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series auto race at Charlotte Motor Speedway Saturday in Concord, N.C.

    NASCAR and Fox sign 8-year extension through 2022

    NASCAR and Fox Sports Media Group announced a $2.4 billion, eight-year extension Monday that runs through 2022 and keeps the prestigious Daytona 500 and first third of the Sprint Cup Series on the network.

  •  
    An experimental drug combination from Abbott Laboratories wiped out all traces of the virus that causes hepatitis C in 99 percent of patients with the liver disease, a study showed.

    Abbott Labs rises on hepatitis C drug data

    North Chicago-based Abbott Laboratories said Monday that its experimental hepatitis C drug regimen cured 99 percent of patients in a midstage study with the most common and hardest-to-treat type of the disease.

  •  
    Republican presidential candidate former Mass. Gov. Mitt Romney, left, takes a bite of pizza during lunch with his wife Ann while campaigning at Village Pizza in Newport, N.H., Dec. 20, 2011. Then-Senator Barack Obama, right, takes a bite of pizza at American Dream Pizza in Corvallis, Ore., March 21, 2008.

    Pizza Hut rethinks presidential debate stunt

    Pizza Hut is rethinking its contest daring people to ask "Sausage or Pepperoni?" at the presidential debate Tuesday.

  •  
    ASSOCIATED PRESS UCLA professor emeritus Lloyd Shapley, left, and Harvard professor Alvin E. Roth were awarded the Nobel economics prize Monday for studies on the match-making that takes place when doctors are coupled up with hospitals, students with schools and human organs with transplant recipients.

    2 Americans win Nobel econ prize for match-making

    Two American scholars were awarded the Nobel economics prize on Monday for studies on the match-making that takes place when doctors are coupled up with hospitals, students with schools and human organs with transplant recipients.

  •  

    Citi beats expectations after loss on brokerage

    Citigroup says it has beat Wall Street predictions for quarterly earnings after stripping out a big loss on its retail brokerage and other one-time charges. Net income was $3.3 billion, excluding one-time items. That amounts to $1.06 per share, beating the 96 cents predicted by analysts polled by financial data provider FactSet. Analyst predictions generally exclude one-time charges and gains.

  •  
    Retail sales in the U.S. rose more than projected in September, reflecting broad-based gains that indicate household spending helped bolster economic growth last quarter.

    Retail sales in U.S. climbed more than forecast in September

    Retail sales in the U.S. rose more than projected in September, reflecting broad-based gains that indicate household spending helped bolster economic growth last quarter.The 1.1 percent advance followed a revised 1.2 percent increase in August that was the biggest since October 2010 and larger than previously reported, Commerce Department figures showed today in Washington.

  •  

    Americans win Nobel econ prize for match-making

    Two Americans were awarded the Nobel economics prize on Monday for studies on the match-making taking place when doctors are coupled up with hospitals, students with schools and human organs with transplant recipients. The work of Alvin Roth and Lloyd Shapley has sparked a "flourishing field of research" and helped improve the performance of many markets, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said.

  •  

    How would candidates’ tax plans affect investors?

    With the outcome of next month's presidential election increasingly hazy, here's a shred of clarity that investors can cling to: The tax rates they pay on investment income like stock profits and dividends are almost certain to change.

  •  
    Four women activists of the Occupy movement protest chained to the pulpit inside St Paul’s Cathedral as preparations for evensong take place in London, Sunday.

    Occupy London activists stage St Paul’s protest

    Several supporters of the anti-corporate Occupy movement chained themselves to the pulpit of St. Paul's Cathedral during a service Sunday in an action marking the anniversary of its now-dismantled protest camp outside the London landmark.

  •  

    Xbox Music to offer on-demand music free on tablet

    Buyers of tablets that run Microsoft's newest operating system, Windows 8, are in for a pleasant musical surprise. They'll be able to pick from millions of songs and stream them for free as long as they put up with an audio ad every 15 minutes.

  •  
    Stan Ades and his wife CC Sofronas wait for traffic to to cross as they ride bicycles to Sunset Elementary School with their children Penelope, 10, from left, Henry, 6, and Capen, 8, in San Francisco, When Californiaís gas prices hit record highs over the past week, the millions of dollars spent in recent years on commuter bike lanes and public transportation projects in Los Angeles, San Francisco and other major cities were seen in a new light by many drivers.

    Oil falls further amid global growth concerns

    The price of oil fell Monday after Chinese economic indicators did little to raise hopes for a rebound in the world's second-largest economy.Benchmark oil for November delivery was down 34 cents to $91.52 per barrel at late afternoon Bangkok time in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. Benchmark oil fell 21 cents Friday to settle at $91.86 per barrel on the Nymex.

  •  

    China economic figures shore up global markets

    A round of figures showing China's economy is in relatively good health helped buoy markets Monday, at the start of a week that could offer greater clarity on the economic fates of Greece and Spain.Figures showing China's inflation rate fell to 1.9 percent in September from 2 percent the month before reinforced investor hopes for more stimulus for in the world's second-largest economy.

  •  

    Poll: Economists foresee weak but improving growth

    Economists foresee only tepid growth for the coming year, with unemployment back above 8 percent for the first half of 2013.The good news: The housing market is recovering faster than expected and the economy likely won't fall off a "fiscal cliff."

  •  
    Publicity artwork for the videogame “League of Legends.” The dizzying world championships of the online battle arena game “League of Legends” concluded Saturday.

    ’League of Legends’ crowns $1 million champions

    It had all the makings of an Olympic event: an indoor arena, play-by-play announcers, 7,000 enthusiastic fans, uniformed competitors from across the globe and swarms of cameras capturing every angle of the action. However, when the crowd erupted into a screaming frenzy each time a player met his demise, it felt much more like "The Hunger Games."

  •  
    A man uses his mobile phone outside a Softbank Corp. store in Tokyo, Japan.

    Softbank to buy 70 percent of Sprint for $20 billion

    Softbank Corp. has reached a deal to buy 70 percent of U.S. mobile carrier Sprint Nextel Corp. for $20.1 billion in the largest ever foreign acquisition by a Japanese company. The agreement, announced Monday at a joint news conference in Tokyo by Softbank President Masayoshi Son and Sprint Chief Executive Dan Hesse, will bring together the third biggest mobile carriers of both Japan and the U.S.

  •  
    Warning signs farmer Cannon Michael put up after burying spike strips on his property to flatten the tires of metal thieves in Dos Palos, Calif.

    For dollars’ worth of copper farmers out thousands

    Cannon Michael is a folk hero across California's agriculture heartland, where these days the price of scrap metal influences a farmer's bottom line as much that of the fine pima cotton he grows.When thieves tore up yet another pricey water pump for the few dollars' worth of copper wire that energize it, the frustrated farmer considered taping $100 bills to the rebuilt system hoping crooks would just grab the easy money next time.

  •  
    Associated Press Brian Kennedy, director of the Toledo Museum of Art, in front of a portrait of French Impressionist Edouard Manet.

    Before Facebook, there was Manet, painting friends

    Long before smartphones turned so many of us into amateur photographers and revolutionized how we depict each other through social media, there were the works of French Impressionist Edouard Manet.Known for portraits of friends and celebrities of his era, the painter often called "the first modern artist" came of age during the mid-1800s when photography first became available to the public. He even kept his own collection of photos of the subjects he painted.

  •  
    The space shuttle Endeavour is moved to the hangar in the California Science Center for its last stop on Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012, in Los Angeles.

    Endeavour finally reaches permanent LA museum hom

    It was supposed to be a slow but smooth journey to retirement, a parade through city streets for a shuttle that logged millions of miles in space.But Endeavour's final mission turned out to be a logistical headache that delayed its arrival to its museum resting place by about 17 hours.

  •  
    Dale Spencer is the founder of Keynote Speaker in Bartlett.

    Bartlett keynote speaker delivers motivation

    We talk with a motivational keynote speaker who presents a powerful, inspiring message for people trying to overcome fears, adversity, or obstacles in their professional or personal life.

  •  

    Transportation company opts for help picking advisory board

    Carolyn Gable, president of New Age Transportation, Distribution & Warehousing Inc. in Lake Zurich, talks to Small Business Columnist Jim Kendall about how she put together her advisory board. She picked an outside company to help.

Life & Entertainment

  •  

    Fox Valley Rep unveils 2013 season

    Fox Valley Repertory's 2013 season includes "Forever Plaid," "Making God Laugh" and more at the Pheasant Run Resort in St. Charles.

  •  
    Alex Goodrich, left, played Kirk, wingman and best friend of Erich Bergan’s Hero, in the world premiere of “Hero the Musical!” at Marriott Theatre in Lincolnshire.

    Goodman, Chicago Shakespeare theaters dominate Jeff Awards

    Suburban theaters including Marriott in Lincolnshire and Drury Lane in Oak Brook failed to win any major awards at Monday's 44th annual Equity Jeff Awards Ceremony in Oak Brook. Goodman Theatre won multiple Jeffs for its epic revival of Eugene O'Neill's "The Iceman Cometh." Director Gary Griffin's glittering production of Stephen Sondheim's "Follies" for Chicago Shakespeare Theater dominated in the musical categories.

  •  
    You might think a bran muffin is healthy, but it can be loaded with sugar, butter and more calories than a doughnut.

    Your Health: Some healthy 'facts' are just myths
    Foods that you thought were healthy might not be the best choices, and learn why vitamin A is so good for you.

  •  

    Is this couple ready to start a family?

    This couple is thinking about starting a family. But, the husband wants the wife to lose weight first and be healthier before they start trying to get pregnant. The wife isn't sure what to do next.

  •  
    Hand-cranked saffron fettuccine partners with figs and a creamy cambozola sauce for a perfect fall dish.

    Homemade pasta worth the extra effort

    I was never very good at making fresh pasta. In my days as a restaurant chef, it was common practice to buy from a purveyor. If it was to be filled, I'd make the filling, he'd pick it up and return the product to me the next day. To me, it was like pizza or croissants: Something made infinitely better by other people.

  •  
    This half-moon-shaped pasta is just right for fall.

    Roasted Brussels Sprouts Agnolotti
    Roasted Brussels Sprouts Agnolotti

  •  
    A pasta cutter is used to form Roasted Brussels Sprout Agnolotti.

    Basic Pasta Dough
    Basic Pasta Dough

  •  
    The beauty of fresh pasta is that it cooks in lasagna, such as this eggplant parmesan version, without having to be parboiled.

    Eggplant Parmigiana Lasagna
    Eggplant Parmigiana Lasagna

  •  
    Hand-cranked saffron fettuccine partners with figs and a creamy cambozola sauce for a perfect fall dish.

    Saffron Fettuccine With Figs and Cambozola Sauce
    Saffron Fettuccine with Figs and Cambozola Sauce

  •  
    Fitbit's target audience for its new Zip is couch potatoes — people for whom even a relatively modest amount of extra activity per day can yield significant benefits.

    New Fitbit targets iPhone-using couch potatoes

    Wearable activity trackers have proliferated recently, and Fitbit's goals with its new Zip are modest: Target couch potatoes — people for whom even a relatively modest amount of extra activity per day can yield significant benefits.

  •  
    The Rolling Stones — Charlie Watts, left, Keith Richards, Ronnie Wood and Mick Jagger — will return to the stage later this year, with four concerts in Newark, N.J., and London.

    Rocking at 50: Rolling Stones to tour again

    You can't always get what you want — but if your desire is to attend a Rolling Stones concert, this might be your lucky day. The legendary band said Monday it would return to the stage this year with four concerts: Nov. 25 and 29 at London's O2 Arena and Dec. 13 and 15 at the Prudential Center in Newark, N.J. The shows mark the first time in five years that the Stones have performed live, with Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Charlie Watts and Ronnie Wood all coming together once more. The band said it was the "crowning glory" of celebrations marking its 50th anniversary of its first gig. "Everybody loves a celebration, and London and New York are two good places to do it in!" Jagger said in a statement.

  •  
    This table on the porch is set for a kid-friendly Halloween party, using a black and white quilt for a tablecloth.

    Treat your house to a touch of Halloween decor

    When I think Halloween, I think of my friend Twila, who does it up big. She likes to weave Halloween decorations into her existing fall decor. For example, she tricked up a bouquet on her entry table by plopping a ghoul in the center. When you decorate for Halloween, don’t do over the whole house. Instead, add some powerful punches in a few key places. One place to start is your dining room.

  •  
    Lunge to twist can help warm up your whole body.

    Get your body workout-ready with dynamic stretching

    Forcing a tight, cold muscle to stretch can increase your chance for injury, so we always recommend working with your natural range of motion as a means to prepare your body for an upcoming workout. Dynamic stretching is a great option for a pre-workout warm-up because it can improve your natural range of motion and prepare your muscles for the upcoming workload.

  •  

    Nasal rinsing may help clear colds, sinus infections

    It was once a truth universally acknowledged that children should not be stuffing things up their little noses. And while that view still holds true generally, shooting large quantities of a saline solution into a child’s nose can work wonders in helping to clear colds and sinus infections.

  •  
    Hip and lower back stretch

    Staying sharp means exercising mind and body

    Major memory loss is generally caused by organic disorders, brain injuries or neurological issues. Good news for senior moments. Fortunately, when it comes to increasing learning and memory skills, research confirms that there are many ways we can sharpen our minds and actually improve memory as we age.

  •  

    Group: More than half in 39 states will be obese

    We Americans already know how fat we are. Can it get much worse? Apparently, yes, according to an advocacy group that predicts that by 2030 more than half the people in the vast majority of states will be obese.

  •  

    U.S. deaths reach record as population grows, ages

    U.S. deaths surpassed 2.5 million for the first time last year, reflecting the nation’s growing and aging population. The increase of about 45,000 more deaths than in 2010 was not surprising. The annual number of deaths has been generally rising for decades as the population has swelled.

  •  

    Doctor’s tale adds credibility to out-of-body experiences

    Although medicine prides itself on having its foundation in hard science, there have been many well-documented reports of patients having out-of-body experiences during surgery and near death. Most of these reports are dismissed as fantasy, but there are some documented experiences that are so detailed as to defy explanation.

  •  
    In the Porzak family, Tom and Darlene have diligently shared a passion for classic cars with their twin 16-year-old daughters, Jenny and Kristin.

    Chevy collection is a family affair

    In the Porzak family, Tom and Darlene have diligently shared a passion for classic cars with their twin daughters, Jenny and Kristin. And, as luck would have it, Tom has accumulated enough vintage rides for each member of the Hoffman Estates clan to happily pilot. “We love getting the whole family together and taking the cars out to a local cruise night,” Kristin said.

  •  

    Washing hands is simple task, but you’ve got to do it right

    I answer a lot of questions about complicated, serious diseases. Yet something all of us do every day is at least as important because we don’t always do it well ­— and we pay a price for that. Washing your hands is one of the best ways to prevent the spread of viruses and bacteria that cause colds, the flu and other infectious illnesses.

  •  
    Wellness coach Kara Whitcomb leads truckers in a stretching regime before their driving shifts start at Con-way Freight in Garland, Texas.

    Push for healthier truckers gains momentum

    From trucking companies embracing wellness and weight-loss programs to gyms being installed at truck stops, momentum has picked up in recent years to help those who make their living driving big rigs get into shape. Tere’s an additional incentive for truckers to stay in shape — their job might depend on their health. Every two years, they must pass a physical exam required by U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration.

  •  
    Arnold Wilkins, left, and Geoff Cole hope to show than an aversion to objects such as lotus seedpods can be seen as a phobia with an evolutionary basis.

    Do holes make you queasy or even fearful?

    Thousands of people claim to suffer trypophobia, a term derived from the Greek “trypo,” which means punching, drilling or boring holes. It refers to an irrational fear of clusters of small holes, such as beehives, ant holes and even bubbles in a pancake on the griddle or air pockets in a chocolate bar.

  •  
    Kevin Earley, 33, holds a bottle of his antipsychotic medication as he stands next to the medicine cabinet, which has an old photo taped to it, in the bathroom of his apartment that he shares with a roommate. Of the photo, Earley says, “It reminds me to take my medicine every day and reminds me of where I have been and what I have been through.”

    Shootings expose cracks in U.S. mental health system

    Andrew Engeldinger’s parents pushed him for two years to seek treatment for what they suspected was mental illness, but there was nothing more they could do. Minnesota law doesn’t allow people to be forced into treatment without proof that they are a threat to themselves or others. Engeldinger’s parents were horrified last week, when their 36-year-old son went on a workplace shooting spree that led to the deaths of a Minneapolis sign company’s owner, several of his employees and a UPS driver. Engeldinger then killed himself.

  •  

    Halloween history and decor

    Is Halloween your favorite holiday? I know several people who like this day even better than they like Christmas or their own birthday. And the decor in their home prooves it.

Discuss

  •  

    Our endorsements for McHenry County Board
    A wrapup of endorsements for candidates running in all six McHenry County Board races.

  •  

    Senate District 27: Murphy
    The Daily Herald endorses Republican Matt Murphy to return to the state Senate in District 27.

  •  

    Endorsement: Morrison over Friedman in state Senate District 29
    Voters in the 29th Senate district will choose Susan Garrett's successor in November, and the Daily Herald endorses West Deerfield Township Supervisor Julie Morrison.

  •  

    Endorsement: Link over Castella in 30th Senate District
    The Daily Herald endorses Democratic state Sen. Terry Link of Waukegan over Republican challenger Don Castella of Lincolnshire in the 30th District Senate race.

  •  

    Endorsement: Kotowski over O’Donnell in 28th Senate District
    The Daily Herald endorses Democratic state Sen. Dan Kotowski over Republican Jim O'Donnell in Illinois Senate District 28.

  •  

    At war with no leader

    By Michael Gerson: This is an administration that instinctively turns to any artifice — any desperate, dubious claim — rather than talk about an ongoing, escalating global conflict with radical Islamist groups.

  •  

    The Big Bird counterattack

    Columnist Charles Krauthammer: Democrats are shellshocked and left searching for excuses. Start with scapegoats: the hapless John Kerry, Obama’s sparring partner in the practice debates, for going too soft on the boss; then the debate moderator for not exerting enough control.

  •  

    Jobs report decrease defies reality
    A Lake Bluff letter to the editor: Regarding The Associated Press article on the jobless rate published in the Daily Herald on Saturday, Oct. 6: Are you with the Romney camp who say, "This is not what a real recovery looks like," or do you accept the Obama camp's response of "We've made too much progress to return to the policies that caused this crisis in the first place"?

  •  

    Protect pets, family from illness
    A Schaumburg letter to the editor: When it comes to streptococcus, for example, the risk of dogs passing the bacteria to people is extremely low. Humans are more likely to serve as hosts for strep — specifically, the form of strep that makes us sick — and a more pressing concern is that we may pass this bacteria along to our pets.

  •  

    Protect bond between fathers, daughters
    A Chicago letter to the editor: But there is nothing “stereotypical” about supporting strong relationships between fathers and daughters. To dismiss the father-daughter dance as a throwback to the days of Ozzie and Harriet implies that very notion of a strong father is itself outdated.

«Sep

Oct 2012

Nov»
S M T W T F S
30 1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31 1 2 3