Buddy to reduce fees for black cats in September

 
By Mary Hayashi
The Buddy Foundation
Posted9/13/2018 9:31 AM
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  • Rio is a handsome, but very shy, long furred male. If you spend some time in Room 2, you might get to meet Rio. He is an exceptionally handsome, almost regal cat, but it will take some time before he warms up to anyone he doesn't know. He has recently been spending more time watching the birds or on top of the steps in the room. As a result, he has become a bit more accessible, but you will still have to approach him slowly. If you are very lucky he may take treats from you, and possibly even let you pet him. He is not at all aggressive and will run and hide if he doesn't take to you.

    Rio is a handsome, but very shy, long furred male. If you spend some time in Room 2, you might get to meet Rio. He is an exceptionally handsome, almost regal cat, but it will take some time before he warms up to anyone he doesn't know. He has recently been spending more time watching the birds or on top of the steps in the room. As a result, he has become a bit more accessible, but you will still have to approach him slowly. If you are very lucky he may take treats from you, and possibly even let you pet him. He is not at all aggressive and will run and hide if he doesn't take to you. Courtesy of The Buddy Foundation

  • Dixie is a bit on the shy side. She will cautiously come out, especially if we are handing out treats to the other residents. She won't crawl into your lap, but if you sit on the couch or the floor she just might decide you are OK and sit next to you. But you will have to be patient to find out that Dixie really is a nice cat.

    Dixie is a bit on the shy side. She will cautiously come out, especially if we are handing out treats to the other residents. She won't crawl into your lap, but if you sit on the couch or the floor she just might decide you are OK and sit next to you. But you will have to be patient to find out that Dixie really is a nice cat. Courtesy of The Buddy Foundation

As cat coordinator with The Buddy Foundation, I get to promote Buddy's felines to potential adopters, which is no easy task because all of us who routinely work in the building have our favorites, myself included.

As I show visitors our felines, a few common negative comments have presented themselves and, after all these years with Buddy, I have to say that I surprise myself with my reaction to those comments.

Most of the negativity is directed at our black felines. People say, "I want to adopt a cat that needs me, but anything but black. I want a cat of color," or "why does Buddy have so many black cats?"

The main answers, in reality, are stupid superstitions and selfishness. If you want a cat that really needs you, you should be looking at the black cats, older cats or those with medical issues.

The comment that really unnerves me is "all black cats look alike, how can you tell them apart?" I am going to put a stop to that erroneous idea right now.

Black felines are magical, sleek little panthers or puffy balls of fluff. They are anything but "bad luck." It's time for people that profess to be cat lovers to come out of the Dark Ages and find black cats to be what they are -- elegant, exotic, entertaining and, for some, vocal pals.

The eyes have it in black felines. Eye color contrast to their black bodies is striking. Eye color can range from orange, copper, gold, aquamarine or blue/violet.

Eye color can be so unusual because most black cats are hybrids of American shorthairs, British shorthairs, Burmese, Bombay or even some Siamese, hence the vocalization. Do you still think black felines are ordinary? I bet not!

Body style can range from sleek to cobbey, (muscular built). The body usually dictates the shape of the head. A sleek, panther-like body usually has a more angled head, associated with oriental felines. A more muscular body is more apt to have a rounder head and face.

Our ebony-coated felines are also more likely to be more interactive. Black cats seem to sense instinctually that they have to charm a person to get a home. They also tend to be entertaining house mates, as well as loyal cuddlers.

Our black felines only have until September to find their forever homes. The Buddy Foundation will responsibly ban all black cat adoptions from that time until after Halloween.

To promote black feline adoptions, Buddy will offer a special adoption fee for our black diamonds. The fee will be only $75. That leaves you extra money to spend on perks for your purrfect felines.

Upcoming:

Bowling for Buddy, a bowling benefit for the welfare of Buddy's homeless and abandoned animals, will be from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 7, at Arlington Lanes, 3435 N. Kennicott Ave., in Arlington Heights.

Admission is $30 for adults or $15 for children ages 12 and younger; $35 at the door. For registration and details, visit www.TheBuddyFoundation.org or call (847) 290-5806.

• The Buddy Foundation, 65 W. Seegers Road, Arlington Heights, is a nonprofit 501(c) 3, shelter. Call (847) 290-5806 or visit www.thebuddyfoundation.org.

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