Beckert, 4-time All-Star second baseman for Cubs, dies in Florida

                                                                                                                                                                                                   
  • Cubs infielder Glenn Beckert in 1968.

    Cubs infielder Glenn Beckert in 1968. Associated Press

  • Cubs infielders Glenn Beckert, left, and Ron Santo relax in their hotel room at the Waldorf Astoria in New York Sept. 8, 1969 after arriving for a two-game series against the Mets.

    Cubs infielders Glenn Beckert, left, and Ron Santo relax in their hotel room at the Waldorf Astoria in New York Sept. 8, 1969 after arriving for a two-game series against the Mets. Associated Press

  • Former Cub second baseman Glenn Beckert shows his batting grip with his cane as he gets a high-five from Ron Coomer during the annual Cubs Convention in January 2015.

    Former Cub second baseman Glenn Beckert shows his batting grip with his cane as he gets a high-five from Ron Coomer during the annual Cubs Convention in January 2015. Daily Herald File Photo

 
 
Updated 4/12/2020 2:49 PM

Glenn Beckert, a second baseman for the Cubs from 1965 to 1973 and a four-time All-Star, passed away in Florida Sunday morning at the age of 79.

Often overshadowed by Hall of Fame teammates Ernie Banks, Billy Williams, Ferguson Jenkins and Ron Santo, Beckert was a key cog for the Cubs.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

"We lost a great one today, Glenn Beckert," Jenkins posted on Twitter Sunday morning. "Glenn was my friend, my teammate and the best man at my wedding. He will be greatly missed. My thoughts and prayers are with the Beckert family."

The Pittsburgh native and former Palatine resident batted .283/.318/.348 with 22 home runs and 353 RBI over nine seasons and 1,247 games with the Cubs.

"Glenn Beckert was a wonderful person who also happened to be an excellent ballplayer," the Cubs said in a statement. "He was a mainstay at second base for the Cubs for nine seasons from 1965 to 1973, earning a spot on four all-star teams and a reputation for one of the toughest at-bats in the league as evidenced by his low strikeout rate. Glenn more than held his own playing alongside future Hall of Famers and won a Gold Glove for defensive excellence at second base in 1968.

"After his playing days concluded, Glenn was a familiar sight at Wrigley Field and numerous Cubs Conventions, and he always had a memory to share of his time on and off the field with his beloved teammates. We offer our deepest condolences to Glenn's daughters, Tracy Seaman and Dana Starck, his longtime partner Marybruce Standley and his many, many friends."

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Beckert's best season with the Cubs came in 1971, when he hit .342/.367/.406 with 2 homers and 42 RBI.

He led the National League with 98 runs scored in 1968.

The 6-foot-1, 190-pounder was traded to San Diego on Nov. 7, 1973, and Beckert slashed .266/.310/.277 in two seasons with the Padres before retiring.

In 5,572 career plate appearances, Beckert struck out only 243 times.

Teaming with shortstop Don Kessinger to give the Cubs airtight defense up the middle, Beckert won a Gold Glove in 1968.

"My condolences to the Beckert family," former Cubs manager Joe Maddon wrote on Twitter.

"Glenn was a part of my Adopt-a-Legend program with the (Tampa Bay) Rays in Port Charlotte. So proud of his minimal strikeouts, we spoke about that often. An all-time Cub great. A gentleman and friend."

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