'His presence brought happiness': Highland Park victim Eduardo Uvaldo mourned as a family man

  • Pallbearers carry the body of Eduardo Uvaldo, who was killed Monday during the mass shooting at the Fourth of July parade in Highland Park, from the Memorial Chapel funeral home after visitation and a service Saturday in Waukegan.

    Pallbearers carry the body of Eduardo Uvaldo, who was killed Monday during the mass shooting at the Fourth of July parade in Highland Park, from the Memorial Chapel funeral home after visitation and a service Saturday in Waukegan. Associated press

  • Mourners hug outside Memorial Chapel funeral home in Waukegan during funeral services Saturday for Eduardo Uvaldo, who was killed Monday during the mass shooting at the Fourth of July parade in Highland Park.

    Mourners hug outside Memorial Chapel funeral home in Waukegan during funeral services Saturday for Eduardo Uvaldo, who was killed Monday during the mass shooting at the Fourth of July parade in Highland Park. Pat Nabong /Chicago Sun-Times via AP

  • Lt. Gov. Juliana Stratton and Gov. J.B. Pritzker exit Memorial Chapel funeral home in Waukegan during funeral services Saturday for Eduardo Uvaldo, who was killed Monday during the mass shooting at the Fourth of July parade in Highland Park.

    Lt. Gov. Juliana Stratton and Gov. J.B. Pritzker exit Memorial Chapel funeral home in Waukegan during funeral services Saturday for Eduardo Uvaldo, who was killed Monday during the mass shooting at the Fourth of July parade in Highland Park. Pat Nabong /Chicago Sun-Times via AP

  • Mourners hug outside Memorial Chapel funeral home in Waukegan during funeral services Monday for Eduardo Uvaldo, who was killed Monday during the mass shooting at the Fourth of July parade in Highland Park.

    Mourners hug outside Memorial Chapel funeral home in Waukegan during funeral services Monday for Eduardo Uvaldo, who was killed Monday during the mass shooting at the Fourth of July parade in Highland Park. Pat Nabong /Chicago Sun-Times via AP

  • Gov. J.B. Pritzker exits Memorial Chapel Funeral Home in Waukegan during funeral services Saturday for Eduardo Uvaldo, who was killed Monday during the mass shooting at the Fourth of July parade in Highland Park.

    Gov. J.B. Pritzker exits Memorial Chapel Funeral Home in Waukegan during funeral services Saturday for Eduardo Uvaldo, who was killed Monday during the mass shooting at the Fourth of July parade in Highland Park. Pat Nabong /Chicago Sun-Times via AP

  • Mourners walk to the Memorial Chapel Funeral Home in Waukegan to pay respects Saturday to Eduardo Uvaldo, who was killed Monday during the mass shooting at the Fourth of July parade in Highland Park.

    Mourners walk to the Memorial Chapel Funeral Home in Waukegan to pay respects Saturday to Eduardo Uvaldo, who was killed Monday during the mass shooting at the Fourth of July parade in Highland Park. Pat Nabong /Chicago Sun-Times via AP

  • Mourners hug outside Memorial Chapel funeral home in Waukegan during funeral services Saturday for Eduardo Uvaldo, who was killed Monday during the mass shooting at the Fourth of July parade in Highland Park.

    Mourners hug outside Memorial Chapel funeral home in Waukegan during funeral services Saturday for Eduardo Uvaldo, who was killed Monday during the mass shooting at the Fourth of July parade in Highland Park. Pat Nabong /Chicago Sun-Times via AP

  • Highland Park Police Chief Lou Jogmen walks to the Memorial Chapel Funeral Home in Waukegan to pay respects Saturday to the family of Eduardo Uvaldo, who was killed Monday during the mass shooting at the Fourth of July parade in Highland Park.

    Highland Park Police Chief Lou Jogmen walks to the Memorial Chapel Funeral Home in Waukegan to pay respects Saturday to the family of Eduardo Uvaldo, who was killed Monday during the mass shooting at the Fourth of July parade in Highland Park. Pat Nabong /Chicago Sun-Times via AP

  • Mourners exit the Memorial Chapel funeral home in Waukegan to pay respects Saturday to Eduardo Uvaldo, who was killed Monday during the mass shooting at the Fourth of July parade in Highland Park.

    Mourners exit the Memorial Chapel funeral home in Waukegan to pay respects Saturday to Eduardo Uvaldo, who was killed Monday during the mass shooting at the Fourth of July parade in Highland Park. Pat Nabong /Chicago Sun-Times via AP

  • Police officers stand outside outside Memorial Chapel of Waukegan in Waukegan, Ill., where Eduardo Uvaldo's funeral was being held, Saturday in Waukegan.

    Police officers stand outside outside Memorial Chapel of Waukegan in Waukegan, Ill., where Eduardo Uvaldo's funeral was being held, Saturday in Waukegan. Pat Nabong /Chicago Sun-Times via AP

  • The hearse carrying the body of Eduardo Uvaldo, who was killed Monday during the mass shooting at the Fourth of July parade in Highland Park, departs after a funeral service at the Memorial Chapel funeral home in Waukegan.

    The hearse carrying the body of Eduardo Uvaldo, who was killed Monday during the mass shooting at the Fourth of July parade in Highland Park, departs after a funeral service at the Memorial Chapel funeral home in Waukegan. Pat Nabong /Chicago Sun-Times via AP

 
 
Updated 7/9/2022 7:41 PM

Friends, neighbors and dignitaries paid their respects Saturday to the family of Eduardo Uvaldo, one of the seven people who were killed in the attack on the July Fourth parade in Highland Park.

Uvaldo, who would have turned 70 on Friday, was a native of Mexico who first moved to the United States when he was 15. In an obituary, he was remembered for his love of his large family -- he was survived by his wife, Maria, four daughters, four siblings, grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

 
Eduardo Uvaldo, 69 of Waukegan, was identified Wednesday as the seventh person killed in Monday's mass shooting in Highland Park, was described as a devoted family man who gave his love unconditionally.
Eduardo Uvaldo, 69 of Waukegan, was identified Wednesday as the seventh person killed in Monday's mass shooting in Highland Park, was described as a devoted family man who gave his love unconditionally. - Courtesy of Chicago Sun-Times

"He was funny, charming, handsome, caring, and most importantly loving," his obituary read. "His presence brought happiness to each family member."

Outside the visitation at The Memorial Chapel of Waukegan, attendee Lilia Cervantes told reporters that she had known Uvaldo for 20 years and had worked with him for 11 years.

"It's a very difficult time for family and co-workers," she said in Spanish. "He was very kind."

Uvaldo's wife and 13-year-old grandson, Brian Franco Hogan, were wounded in the attack and are still recovering, the Chicago Sun-Times reported.

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Relative Jesse Palacios attended the private service and called Uvaldo "a happy man," the newspaper reported.

"I don't think I've ever seen him sad," Palacios said.

Among those who paid their respects Saturday were Gov. J.B. Pritzker, Lieutenant Gov. Juliana Stratton, Highland Park Mayor Nancy Rotering and Highland Park's police chief, Lou Jogmen.

Uvaldo died Wednesday at an Evanston hospital from wounds suffered during the attack on the parade.

Separate funerals were held Friday for three of the other victims -- 63-year-old Jacquelyn Sundheim, 88-year-old Stephen Straus and 78-year-old Nicolas Toledo-Zaragoza, who, like Uvaldo, was from Waukegan.

Funeral details for the others killed in the attack haven't been made public. Authorities have identified them as 64-year-old Katherine "Katie" Goldstein and a married couple, 35-year-old Irina McCarthy and 37-year-old Kevin McCarthy, who were attending the parade with their 2-year-old son.

Police say the victims were shot at random and that the assailant had no racial or religious motivation.

"This is what I can't understand: how this keeps happening," Palacios said, referring to mass shootings in the U.S.

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