U.S. Rep. Mike Quigley's campaign spent more money than it collected in first quarter, records show

  • U.S. Rep. Mike Quigley

    U.S. Rep. Mike Quigley

  • Malgorzata McGonigal

    Malgorzata McGonigal

  • Tommy Hanson

    Tommy Hanson

 
 
Updated 4/22/2022 3:59 PM

U.S. Rep. Mike Quigley's campaign spent more money in the year's first quarter than it brought in, a unique feat among representatives serving the Chicago suburbs.

The Quigley for Congress committee paid out $103,285 in campaign expenses and donations to other political groups during the period but only collected $94,355, Quigley's latest federal financial report shows.

 

Those numbers dwarf the fundraising and spending of the only other 5th District candidate to file a quarterly report.

Quigley, a Chicago Democrat who represents the 5th District, is unopposed in his party's June 28 primary. The Republican race features two candidates: Malgorzata McGonigal of North Barrington and Tommy Hanson of Chicago.

McGonigal turned in a quarterly report. Hanson didn't.

Redrawn for the 2022 election, the 5th District cuts diagonally through Cook and Lake counties between Chicago's Near North Side and the Barrington area.

Congressional candidates must file quarterly financial reports with the Federal Election Commission once their campaigns collect or spend at least $5,000. First-quarter reports covering Jan. 1 through March 31 were due last week and can be viewed at fec.gov.

Team Quigley started the quarter with nearly $1.18 million in the bank. It collected about $12,353 from individual donors and $82,000 from political action committees representing special interests. Many of those committees represent groups or companies in the aviation and transportation industries, including the following contributors:

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• The BNSF Railway, which gave $2,000.

• Delta Air Lines, which sent $1,000.

• Southwest Airlines, which gave $2,500.

• United Airlines, which sent $3,000.

• The National Air Traffic Controllers Association, which gave $1,000.

Quigley backers in other industries included FedEx, J.P. Morgan Chase, the Allstate Insurance Co. and AT&T.

Team Quigley spent about $68,085 on operating expenses during the quarter. It also gave $35,200 to other political groups and campaigns. Recipients included:

• The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, which got $30,000.

• The Democratic Party of Illinois, which got $2,500.

• The LGBTQ rights group Equality Illinois, which received $700.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

Quigley's committee finished the quarter with nearly $1.17 million saved and no debts.

A Quigley spokeswoman declined to comment on the report.

The McGonigal for Congress committee began fundraising last quarter and reported $1,037 in donations, including $100 from the candidate. It spent nearly $812 and finished March with about $225 saved and no debts.

McGonigal campaign treasurer Al Braun acknowledged the team's fundraising has only just begun but said the campaign "is now in full swing."

Hanson, who unsuccessfully challenged Quigley in 2018 and 2020, said he won't accept campaign donations and won't file financial reports with the FEC.

Quigley has represented the 5th District since 2009. Last month, ahead of a possible Chicago mayoral campaign in 2023, Quigley registered a new political campaign committee with state election officials called Quigley for Chicago.

Quigley's congressional committee paid $53,300 for a Quigley for Chicago poll on April 8, after the FEC quarter ended, records show.

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