Elgin could receive $600K to help fight the opioid epidemic locally

 
 
Updated 1/27/2022 5:29 PM

Elgin could receive roughly $600,000 from a national opioid settlement to help fight the epidemic locally.

The settlement deal was reached last July by 14 state attorneys general to resolve more than 4,000 lawsuits accusing three pharmaceutical distributors -- McKesson, Cardinal Health and AmerisourceBergen -- and opioid manufacturer Janssen, which is owned by Johnson & Johnson, of ignoring signs of opioid addiction, overselling pain pills and downplaying the risks.

 

The settlement with the three distributors and the manufacturer would pay a maximum of $26 billion over about a decade. Of that amount, $22.8 billion would go to states and local governments. Illinois is expected to receive approximately $790 million.

The funds can pay for drug abatement and treatment caused by the opioid epidemic. Money given to Illinois will be divided between the state, local governments and a statewide remediation fund.

On Wednesday, William Cogley, Elgin's corporation counsel, told city council members that he has not confirmed the amount. But he estimates Elgin's share will be in the range of $600,000.

"We believe this would be a start in helping address some of the serious problems this particular issue has created in our community," Cogley said.

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The council unanimously approved Elgin's participation in the settlement during the meeting.

"The opioid epidemic has definitely impacted a lot of communities, a lot of families," council member Tish Powell said. "Anything that we can get from this settlement that we can use to help impacted persons and families in our community, I think, would definitely be welcomed."

Mayor David Kaptain said he and city manager Rick Kozal met Wednesday with three nonprofit groups that deal with opioid addiction as they begin the task of deciding how the money will be distributed.

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