Images: Civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr.

 
 
Posted1/17/2022 1:00 AM

Monday, Jan. 17, 2022 is the annual Martin Luther King Jr. day of service holiday and a day to celebrate the civil rights leader's life and legacy.

In this Aug. 28, 1963 file photo, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., head of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, speaks to thousands during his "I Have a Dream" speech in front of the Lincoln Memorial for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, in Washington. A new documentary "MLK/FBI," shows how FBI director J. Edgar Hoover used the full force of his federal law enforcement agency to attack King and his progressive, nonviolent cause. That included wiretaps, blackmail and informers, trying to find dirt on King.
In this Aug. 28, 1963 file photo, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., head of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, speaks to thousands during his "I Have a Dream" speech in front of the Lincoln Memorial for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, in Washington. A new documentary "MLK/FBI," shows how FBI director J. Edgar Hoover used the full force of his federal law enforcement agency to attack King and his progressive, nonviolent cause. That included wiretaps, blackmail and informers, trying to find dirt on King.
Associated Press
In this Oct. 19, 1960 file photo, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., right, looks out the window of a police car as he and Spelman College student Agnes Blondean Orbert, arrested with him at Rich's Department Store, are taken to jail, in Atlanta.. Driving the car is Atlanta Police Capt. R.E. Little. Following the publication of "An Appeal for Human Rights" on March 9, 1960, students at Atlanta's historically black colleges waged a nonviolent campaign of boycotts and sit-ins protesting segregation at restaurants, theaters, parks and government buildings.
In this Oct. 19, 1960 file photo, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., right, looks out the window of a police car as he and Spelman College student Agnes Blondean Orbert, arrested with him at Rich's Department Store, are taken to jail, in Atlanta.. Driving the car is Atlanta Police Capt. R.E. Little. Following the publication of "An Appeal for Human Rights" on March 9, 1960, students at Atlanta's historically black colleges waged a nonviolent campaign of boycotts and sit-ins protesting segregation at restaurants, theaters, parks and government buildings.
Associated Press
In this Oct. 25, 1960 file photo, Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., integration leader, is escorted from the Atlanta, Ga. jail by two unidentified officers as he is taken to neighboring DeKalb county courthouse for a traffic hearing. Following the publication of "An Appeal for Human Rights" on March 9, 1960, students at Atlanta's historically black colleges waged a nonviolent campaign of boycotts and sit-ins protesting segregation at restaurants, theaters, parks and government buildings.
In this Oct. 25, 1960 file photo, Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., integration leader, is escorted from the Atlanta, Ga. jail by two unidentified officers as he is taken to neighboring DeKalb county courthouse for a traffic hearing. Following the publication of "An Appeal for Human Rights" on March 9, 1960, students at Atlanta's historically black colleges waged a nonviolent campaign of boycotts and sit-ins protesting segregation at restaurants, theaters, parks and government buildings.
Associated Press
In this Oct. 19, 1960 file photo, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. under arrest by Atlanta Police Captain R.E. Little, left rear, passes through a picket line outside Rich's Department Store, in atlanta. On King's right are Atlanta Student Movement leader Lonnie King and Spelman College student Marilyn Pryce. Holding the sign is Spelman student activist Ida Rose McCree. Following the publication of "An Appeal for Human Rights" on March 9, 1960, students at Atlanta's historically black colleges waged a nonviolent campaign of boycotts and sit-ins protesting segregation at restaurants, theaters, parks and government buildings.
In this Oct. 19, 1960 file photo, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. under arrest by Atlanta Police Captain R.E. Little, left rear, passes through a picket line outside Rich's Department Store, in atlanta. On King's right are Atlanta Student Movement leader Lonnie King and Spelman College student Marilyn Pryce. Holding the sign is Spelman student activist Ida Rose McCree. Following the publication of "An Appeal for Human Rights" on March 9, 1960, students at Atlanta's historically black colleges waged a nonviolent campaign of boycotts and sit-ins protesting segregation at restaurants, theaters, parks and government buildings.
Associated Press
In this March 25, 1965, file photo, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and his wife, Coretta Scott King, lead off the final lap to the state capitol at Montgomery, Ala., as thousands of civil rights marchers joined in the walk to demand voter registration rights for blacks. A new project launched in March 2020 by the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research at Harvard University and a coalition of foundations seeks to bring online, interactive lessons about Selma and voting rights to students who are home from school due to the novel coronavirus.
In this March 25, 1965, file photo, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and his wife, Coretta Scott King, lead off the final lap to the state capitol at Montgomery, Ala., as thousands of civil rights marchers joined in the walk to demand voter registration rights for blacks. A new project launched in March 2020 by the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research at Harvard University and a coalition of foundations seeks to bring online, interactive lessons about Selma and voting rights to students who are home from school due to the novel coronavirus.
Associated Press
In this Oct. 25, 1960 file photo, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. leaves court after being given a four-month sentence in Decatur, Ga., for taking part in a lunch counter sit-in at Rich's department store. Following the publication of "An Appeal for Human Rights" on March 9, 1960, students at Atlanta's historically black colleges waged a nonviolent campaign of boycotts and sit-ins protesting segregation at restaurants, theaters, parks and government buildings.
In this Oct. 25, 1960 file photo, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. leaves court after being given a four-month sentence in Decatur, Ga., for taking part in a lunch counter sit-in at Rich's department store. Following the publication of "An Appeal for Human Rights" on March 9, 1960, students at Atlanta's historically black colleges waged a nonviolent campaign of boycotts and sit-ins protesting segregation at restaurants, theaters, parks and government buildings.
Associated Press
In this March 17, 1965, file photo, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., fourth from left, foreground, locks arms with his aides as he leads a march of several thousands to the courthouse in Montgomery, Ala. From left are: an unidentified woman, Rev. Ralph Abernathy, James Foreman, King, Jesse Douglas Sr., and John Lewis. Lewis, who carried the struggle against racial discrimination from Southern battlegrounds of the 1960s to the halls of Congress, died Friday, July 17, 2020.
In this March 17, 1965, file photo, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., fourth from left, foreground, locks arms with his aides as he leads a march of several thousands to the courthouse in Montgomery, Ala. From left are: an unidentified woman, Rev. Ralph Abernathy, James Foreman, King, Jesse Douglas Sr., and John Lewis. Lewis, who carried the struggle against racial discrimination from Southern battlegrounds of the 1960s to the halls of Congress, died Friday, July 17, 2020.
Associated Press
Floyd B. McKissick, left, national director of the Congress of Racial Equality, and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. conduct an outdoor news conference in Grenada, Miss., June 15, 1966, at which time they said they would continue the Meredith march into Mississippi's delta region on a non-violent basis and that those in the march who do not subscribe to the non-violent principle "will be asked to leave."
Floyd B. McKissick, left, national director of the Congress of Racial Equality, and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. conduct an outdoor news conference in Grenada, Miss., June 15, 1966, at which time they said they would continue the Meredith march into Mississippi's delta region on a non-violent basis and that those in the march who do not subscribe to the non-violent principle "will be asked to leave."
Associated Press
In this Aug. 9, 1965, file photo, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, chats with his wife, Coretta, left, and civil rights champion Constance Baker Motley before the start of an S.C.L.C. banquet in Birmingham, Ala. The NAACP's Legal Defense Fund launched a $40 million scholarship program on Monday, Jan. 18, 2021, to create a new generation of civil rights lawyers. The Marshall-Motley Scholars Program, named for the legal defense fund's founder and Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, and his staff attorney Constance Baker Motley, who later became the first Black female federal judge. \
In this Aug. 9, 1965, file photo, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, chats with his wife, Coretta, left, and civil rights champion Constance Baker Motley before the start of an S.C.L.C. banquet in Birmingham, Ala. The NAACP's Legal Defense Fund launched a $40 million scholarship program on Monday, Jan. 18, 2021, to create a new generation of civil rights lawyers. The Marshall-Motley Scholars Program, named for the legal defense fund's founder and Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, and his staff attorney Constance Baker Motley, who later became the first Black female federal judge. \
Associated Press
In this Aug. 28, 1963 file photo, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., head of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, addresses marchers during his "I Have a Dream" speech at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington. The annual celebration of the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday in his hometown in Atlanta is calling for renewed dedication to nonviolence following a turbulent year. The slain civil rights leader's daughter, the Rev. Bernice King, said in an online church service Monday, Jan. 18, 2021, that physical violence and hateful speech are "out of control" in the aftermath of a divisive election followed by a deadly siege on the U.S. Capitol in Washington by supporters of President Donald Trump.
In this Aug. 28, 1963 file photo, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., head of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, addresses marchers during his "I Have a Dream" speech at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington. The annual celebration of the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday in his hometown in Atlanta is calling for renewed dedication to nonviolence following a turbulent year. The slain civil rights leader's daughter, the Rev. Bernice King, said in an online church service Monday, Jan. 18, 2021, that physical violence and hateful speech are "out of control" in the aftermath of a divisive election followed by a deadly siege on the U.S. Capitol in Washington by supporters of President Donald Trump.
Associated Press
In this March 21, 1965 file photo, Dr. Martin Luther King, foreground row, fifth from right, waves as marchers stream across the Alabama River on the first of a five day, 50-mile march to the state capitol at Montgomery, Ala. The annual celebration of the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday in his hometown in Atlanta is calling for renewed dedication to nonviolence following a turbulent year. The slain civil rights leader's daughter, the Rev. Bernice King, said in an online church service Monday, Jan. 18, 2021, that physical violence and hateful speech are "out of control" in the aftermath of a divisive election followed by a deadly siege on the U.S. Capitol in Washington by supporters of President Donald Trump.
In this March 21, 1965 file photo, Dr. Martin Luther King, foreground row, fifth from right, waves as marchers stream across the Alabama River on the first of a five day, 50-mile march to the state capitol at Montgomery, Ala. The annual celebration of the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday in his hometown in Atlanta is calling for renewed dedication to nonviolence following a turbulent year. The slain civil rights leader's daughter, the Rev. Bernice King, said in an online church service Monday, Jan. 18, 2021, that physical violence and hateful speech are "out of control" in the aftermath of a divisive election followed by a deadly siege on the U.S. Capitol in Washington by supporters of President Donald Trump.
Associated Press
In this file photo taken April 12, 1963 Rev. Ralph Abernathy, left, and Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., right are taken by a policeman as they led a line of demonstrators into the business section of Birmingham, Ala.  Arrested for leading a march against racial segregation in 1963, King Jr. spent days in solitary confinement writing his "Letter From Birmingham Jail," which was smuggled out and stirred the world by explaining why Black people couldn't keep waiting for fair treatment.
In this file photo taken April 12, 1963 Rev. Ralph Abernathy, left, and Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., right are taken by a policeman as they led a line of demonstrators into the business section of Birmingham, Ala. Arrested for leading a march against racial segregation in 1963, King Jr. spent days in solitary confinement writing his "Letter From Birmingham Jail," which was smuggled out and stirred the world by explaining why Black people couldn't keep waiting for fair treatment.
Associated Press
Rev. Ralph Abernathy, left, and Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. lead a column of demonstrators as they attempt to march on Birmingham, Ala., city hall April 12, 1963. Police intercepted the group short of their goal. Rev. Jonathan McPherson, shown in a coat and tie two people behind King, in 2021 is urging protesters against racial injustice to "keep on keeping on."
Rev. Ralph Abernathy, left, and Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. lead a column of demonstrators as they attempt to march on Birmingham, Ala., city hall April 12, 1963. Police intercepted the group short of their goal. Rev. Jonathan McPherson, shown in a coat and tie two people behind King, in 2021 is urging protesters against racial injustice to "keep on keeping on."
Associated Press
Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., appears at an integration rally in Montgomery, Ala., May 21, 1961. The estate of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. has reached an agreement with HarperCollins Publishers for rights to his archive. HarperCollins released King's first book more than 60 years ago. The King Estate had been publishing books since 2009 with the Beacon Press.
Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., appears at an integration rally in Montgomery, Ala., May 21, 1961. The estate of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. has reached an agreement with HarperCollins Publishers for rights to his archive. HarperCollins released King's first book more than 60 years ago. The King Estate had been publishing books since 2009 with the Beacon Press.
Associated Press
In this 1960 file photo, Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. speaks in Atlanta. The estate of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. has reached an agreement with HarperCollins Publishers for rights to his archive. HarperCollins released King's first book more than 60 years ago. The King Estate had been publishing books since 2009 with the Beacon Press.
In this 1960 file photo, Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. speaks in Atlanta. The estate of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. has reached an agreement with HarperCollins Publishers for rights to his archive. HarperCollins released King's first book more than 60 years ago. The King Estate had been publishing books since 2009 with the Beacon Press.
Associated Press
In this June 5, 1964, file photo, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. looks at a glass door of his rented beach cottage in St. Augustine, Fla., that was shot into. The house connected to King  is now in the hands of a couple who plans to preserve it. David Manaute and Patti Barry live in the house on the coastline south of St. Augustine.
In this June 5, 1964, file photo, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. looks at a glass door of his rented beach cottage in St. Augustine, Fla., that was shot into. The house connected to King is now in the hands of a couple who plans to preserve it. David Manaute and Patti Barry live in the house on the coastline south of St. Augustine.
Associated Press
The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., right, accompanied by Rev. Ralph D. Abernathy, center, is booked by city police Lt. D.H. Lackey in Montgomery, Ala., on Feb. 23, 1956.  The quest by a civil rights pioneer to have her arrest record wiped clean after nearly 70 years after she protested racial segregation has raised the possibility of similar bids to clear the names of Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King Jr., whose convictions remain on the books in Alabama's capital.
The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., right, accompanied by Rev. Ralph D. Abernathy, center, is booked by city police Lt. D.H. Lackey in Montgomery, Ala., on Feb. 23, 1956. The quest by a civil rights pioneer to have her arrest record wiped clean after nearly 70 years after she protested racial segregation has raised the possibility of similar bids to clear the names of Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King Jr., whose convictions remain on the books in Alabama's capital.
Associated Press
Martin Luther King, Jr. and his civil rights marchers cross the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Ala., March 21, 1965, heading for capitol, Montgomery, during a five day, 50 mile walk to protest voting laws.
Martin Luther King, Jr. and his civil rights marchers cross the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Ala., March 21, 1965, heading for capitol, Montgomery, during a five day, 50 mile walk to protest voting laws.
Associated Press
The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. stands with other civil rights leaders on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tenn., April 3, 1968, a day before he was assassinated at approximately the same place. From left are Hosea Williams, Jesse Jackson, King and Ralph Abernathy.
The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. stands with other civil rights leaders on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tenn., April 3, 1968, a day before he was assassinated at approximately the same place. From left are Hosea Williams, Jesse Jackson, King and Ralph Abernathy.
Associated Press
Civil rights demonstrators gather at the Washington Monument grounds before noon, ahead of marching to the Lincoln Memorial, seen in the far background at right, where the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom will end with a speech by the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., now known as the "I Have A Dream" speech.
Civil rights demonstrators gather at the Washington Monument grounds before noon, ahead of marching to the Lincoln Memorial, seen in the far background at right, where the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom will end with a speech by the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., now known as the "I Have A Dream" speech.
Associated Press
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