Rosenberg, Padovani honored before departures from Arlington Heights village board

  • Arlington Heights Trustees Bert Rosenberg, middle, and Greg Padovani, right, were honored Monday ahead of their final village board meeting.

    Arlington Heights Trustees Bert Rosenberg, middle, and Greg Padovani, right, were honored Monday ahead of their final village board meeting. John Starks | Staff Photographer

  • Bert Rosenberg

    Bert Rosenberg

  • Greg Padovani

    Greg Padovani

  • Arlington Heights Trustee Bert Rosenberg was recognized for his 34 years of public service during a reception at village hall this week.

    Arlington Heights Trustee Bert Rosenberg was recognized for his 34 years of public service during a reception at village hall this week. John Starks | Staff Photographer

  • Arlington Heights Trustee Greg Padovani is greeted by Arlington Heights Memorial Library Trustee Deb Smart during a reception at village hall this week.

    Arlington Heights Trustee Greg Padovani is greeted by Arlington Heights Memorial Library Trustee Deb Smart during a reception at village hall this week. John Starks | Staff Photographer

 
 
Updated 4/21/2021 7:11 PM

A pair of Arlington Heights trustees were recognized this week for their years of public service as they prepared to depart the village board.

Bert Rosenberg and Greg Padovani were feted by friends and colleagues during a rare, in-person village hall reception with masks and limited capacity on Monday. They were honored again later that night at a public board meeting held virtually.

 

Rosenberg, on the board since 2000, and Padovani, appointed to the elected panel in 2019, decided not to run in the recent municipal elections.

Incumbents Jim Tinaglia and Rich Baldino will be sworn in to new 4-year terms May 3, along with newcomers Jim Bertucci and Nicolle Grasse.

For Rosenberg, his retirement comes after more than two decades as a trustee, and a total of 34 years in public service.

When he was looking to get involved as a village volunteer in 1987, then-Mayor Jim Ryan appointed him to the environmental commission -- a panel of which Rosenberg eventually became chairman. In 1991, he was appointed to the O'Hare Noise Compatibility Commission.

After then-Mayor Arlene Mulder appointed Rosenberg to fill a vacancy on the village board in 2000, he went on to win five terms, eventually becoming the board's senior trustee.

In a proclamation declaring April 19 as Trustee Bert Rosenberg Day in Arlington Heights, Mayor Tom Hayes recognized his president pro tem for contributions to the village's growth and fiscal stability, which included "keen oversight of the budget and attention to detail."

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Rosenberg, a CPA long considered the board's financial guru, thanked Hayes, fellow trustees and the village staff for helping Arlington Heights become what he called "one of the greatest communities in the country."

But, he quipped: "I know that several of the staff will not miss me and all of my questions every week, especially at budget times, and the finance department cringing with all the Post-it notes that I put together for the yearly budget meetings. But I think someone will be able to follow in my footsteps and continue on."

Padovani, a longtime community volunteer, business owner and resident, was appointed by Hayes to fill the vacancy of Tom Glasgow in January 2019. Padovani is perhaps best known as chairman of the Veterans Memorial Committee of Arlington Heights, which organizes the annual Memorial Day parade and ceremony and provides assistance and resources to area veterans.

He also has been a board member of the Arlington Heights Chamber of Commerce and the Arlington Heights Park Foundation.

Padovani said he was blessed to serve in another capacity.

"Having lived here 45 years and raised a family with my wife, I thought I knew a lot about Arlington Heights, but I learned so much in the last two years," he said. "I feel very confident in stepping away from the board that this town is in very, very good hands."

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