Parents group wants District 50 schools to reopen to in-person learning

  • A Woodland School District 50 parents group holds a rally Saturday in Gurnee urging the school board to vote to bring kids back to classrooms.

    A Woodland School District 50 parents group holds a rally Saturday in Gurnee urging the school board to vote to bring kids back to classrooms. Brian Hill | Staff Photographer

  • Jaclyn Gore of Wildwood raises her "Learning is Essential" sign for people passing by to see as a Woodland School District 50 parents group hold a rally Saturday in Gurnee urging the school board to vote to bring kids back to classrooms.

    Jaclyn Gore of Wildwood raises her "Learning is Essential" sign for people passing by to see as a Woodland School District 50 parents group hold a rally Saturday in Gurnee urging the school board to vote to bring kids back to classrooms. Brian Hill | Staff Photographer

  • Tanya Abby of Wildwood carries an armful of signs as a Woodland School District 50 parents group hold a rally Saturday in Gurnee urging the school board to vote to bring kids back to classrooms.

    Tanya Abby of Wildwood carries an armful of signs as a Woodland School District 50 parents group hold a rally Saturday in Gurnee urging the school board to vote to bring kids back to classrooms. Brian Hill | Staff Photographer

 
Daily Herald report
Updated 2/13/2021 8:14 PM

Parents and students unhappy that Gurnee-based Woodland School District 50 still isn't offering any in-person classes rallied Saturday afternoon in the snow and cold to make their views known.

About 20 people with signs joined in the rally. They are frustrated that the district is one of the few in the area that still hasn't added any form of in-person learning, said Tanya Abby of Wildwood. Protesters urged the school board to vote to bring students back to the classrooms.

 

The board in December approved a hybrid learning plan but didn't set dates for a return. In January, the board voted to delay the in-person return for students until after spring break (March 29) in the hope that would allow staff to receive both doses of the COVID-19 vaccine, according to information posted on the district's website.

"While this option has some clear safety benefits, I realize this decision will generate a wide range of opinions based on how this impacts your family and your child," Superintendent Lori Casey said.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Friday said that schools can reopen safely without vaccinations if other steps, including masking and social distancing, are taken.

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