Images: 75th Anniversary of VE Day

 
Associated Press
Posted5/8/2020 4:00 AM

Friday, May 8, marks the 75th anniversary of Victory in Europe Day, or VE Day. This was the day Germany offered their unconditional surrender to the Allied forces during World War II.

Pfc. Clarence K. Ayers of Evansville, Ind., reads the news of V-E Day as newly arrived German prisoners stand of a New York City pier, May 8, 1945.
Pfc. Clarence K. Ayers of Evansville, Ind., reads the news of V-E Day as newly arrived German prisoners stand of a New York City pier, May 8, 1945.
Associated Press
An American soldier, right, hugs an Englishwoman as other U.S. soldiers celebrate the surrender of Germany, May 7, 1945, in London's Piccadilly Circus.
An American soldier, right, hugs an Englishwoman as other U.S. soldiers celebrate the surrender of Germany, May 7, 1945, in London's Piccadilly Circus.
Associated Press
Shoppers line up for bread on Chelsea's Pimlico Road, London, on VE Day, May 8, 1945. London's shopkeepers opened their doors for only two hours so Londoner's could buy groceries to last them over the Victory Holiday period.
Shoppers line up for bread on Chelsea's Pimlico Road, London, on VE Day, May 8, 1945. London's shopkeepers opened their doors for only two hours so Londoner's could buy groceries to last them over the Victory Holiday period.
Associated Press
Britain's Prime Minister Winston Churchill leaves the House of Commons, London, on VE Day, May 8, 1945, in a procession of MPs after officially announcing Germany's unconditional surrender. In a spontaneous move, the House is attending a service at nearby St. Margaret's Church to give thanks for peace.
Britain's Prime Minister Winston Churchill leaves the House of Commons, London, on VE Day, May 8, 1945, in a procession of MPs after officially announcing Germany's unconditional surrender. In a spontaneous move, the House is attending a service at nearby St. Margaret's Church to give thanks for peace.
Associated Press
Looking north from 44th Street, New York's Times Square is packed Monday, May 7, 1945, with crowds celebrating the news of Germany's unconditional surrender in World War II.
Looking north from 44th Street, New York's Times Square is packed Monday, May 7, 1945, with crowds celebrating the news of Germany's unconditional surrender in World War II.
Associated Press
Sir Gordon Lethem, Governor of British Guiana, announces Germany's unconditional surrender from the balcony of the Public Buildings in Georgetown, British Guiana, on VE Day, May 8, 1945.
Sir Gordon Lethem, Governor of British Guiana, announces Germany's unconditional surrender from the balcony of the Public Buildings in Georgetown, British Guiana, on VE Day, May 8, 1945.
Associated Press
Staff Sgt. Arthur Moore of Buffalo, N.Y., who was wounded in Belgium, stands on 42nd Street near Grand Central Station in New York Monday, May 7, 1945 as New Yorkers celebrate news of VE Day, victory over Nazi Germany.
Staff Sgt. Arthur Moore of Buffalo, N.Y., who was wounded in Belgium, stands on 42nd Street near Grand Central Station in New York Monday, May 7, 1945 as New Yorkers celebrate news of VE Day, victory over Nazi Germany.
Associated Press
People crowd Times Square at 42nd Street in New York City on May 8, 1945, as the VE Day celebration continues into the night. The dimout and the brownout of the "Great White Way" have been replaced once more by the bright lights of victory.
People crowd Times Square at 42nd Street in New York City on May 8, 1945, as the VE Day celebration continues into the night. The dimout and the brownout of the "Great White Way" have been replaced once more by the bright lights of victory.
Associated Press
Through streets lined deep with jubilant Danish crowds, British troops enter the city of Copenhagen during VE Day celebrations on May 11, 1945, after the announcement of Germany's unconditional surrender to the Allies.
Through streets lined deep with jubilant Danish crowds, British troops enter the city of Copenhagen during VE Day celebrations on May 11, 1945, after the announcement of Germany's unconditional surrender to the Allies.
Associated Press
A vast crowd assembled in front of Buckingham Palace, London, on VE Day, May 8, 1945, cheers the Royal Family as they come out on the balcony, centre, minutes after the official announcement of Germany's unconditional surrender. From left are: Princess Elizabeth; Queen Elizabeth; King George VI; and Princess Margaret.
A vast crowd assembled in front of Buckingham Palace, London, on VE Day, May 8, 1945, cheers the Royal Family as they come out on the balcony, centre, minutes after the official announcement of Germany's unconditional surrender. From left are: Princess Elizabeth; Queen Elizabeth; King George VI; and Princess Margaret.
Associated Press
Two men climb a lamppost during nighttime VE Day celebrations in the West End of London, England, on May 7, 1945.
Two men climb a lamppost during nighttime VE Day celebrations in the West End of London, England, on May 7, 1945.
Associated Press
Britain's Prime Minister Winston Churchill, center, joins the royal family, from left, Princess Elizabeth, Queen Elizabeth, King George VI, and Princess Margaret, on the balcony of Buckingham Palace, London, England, on VE Day on May 8, 1945.
Britain's Prime Minister Winston Churchill, center, joins the royal family, from left, Princess Elizabeth, Queen Elizabeth, King George VI, and Princess Margaret, on the balcony of Buckingham Palace, London, England, on VE Day on May 8, 1945.
Associated Press
This is an aerial view of the Arc de Triomphe in Paris on VE Day, May 7, 1945, shows thousands of French people celebrating the announcement of Germany's unconditional surrender to the Allies. British, American and French servicemen mingled with the crowds who sang and danced throughout the night.
This is an aerial view of the Arc de Triomphe in Paris on VE Day, May 7, 1945, shows thousands of French people celebrating the announcement of Germany's unconditional surrender to the Allies. British, American and French servicemen mingled with the crowds who sang and danced throughout the night.
Associated Press
Staff Sgt. Arthur Moore of Buffalo, N.Y., who was wounded in Belgium, stands on 42nd Street near Grand Central Station in New York Monday, May 7, 1945 as New Yorkers celebrate news of VE Day, victory over Nazi Germany.
Staff Sgt. Arthur Moore of Buffalo, N.Y., who was wounded in Belgium, stands on 42nd Street near Grand Central Station in New York Monday, May 7, 1945 as New Yorkers celebrate news of VE Day, victory over Nazi Germany.
Associated Press
Britain's Prime Minister Winston Churchill leaves the House of Commons, London, on VE Day, May 8, 1945, in a procession of MPs after officially announcing Germany's unconditional surrender. In a spontaneous move, the House is attending a service at nearby St. Margaret's Church to give thanks for peace.
Britain's Prime Minister Winston Churchill leaves the House of Commons, London, on VE Day, May 8, 1945, in a procession of MPs after officially announcing Germany's unconditional surrender. In a spontaneous move, the House is attending a service at nearby St. Margaret's Church to give thanks for peace.
Associated Press
People crowd into the street outside the U.S. and British Embassies, Lisbon, Portugal, on VE Day, May 8, 1945. Jubilant crowds celebrated for two days and nights.
People crowd into the street outside the U.S. and British Embassies, Lisbon, Portugal, on VE Day, May 8, 1945. Jubilant crowds celebrated for two days and nights.
Associated Press
President Harry S. Truman smiles happily as he announces to the press the complete victory of the Allies over Germany, during a ceremony at the White House in Washington, D.C., May 8, 1945. Seated near the wall behind Truman are, left to right: Elmer Davis, Secretary Henry A. Wallace, Maj. Gen. Philip Fleming, Rep. Joseph Martin, Jr., Gen. George C. Marshall, J. Leonard Reinsch, Col. Harry Vaughan, John Snyder, first lady Bess Truman, Mary Margaret Truman and Secretary of War Henry Stimson. Fred M. Vinson is in the foreground.
President Harry S. Truman smiles happily as he announces to the press the complete victory of the Allies over Germany, during a ceremony at the White House in Washington, D.C., May 8, 1945. Seated near the wall behind Truman are, left to right: Elmer Davis, Secretary Henry A. Wallace, Maj. Gen. Philip Fleming, Rep. Joseph Martin, Jr., Gen. George C. Marshall, J. Leonard Reinsch, Col. Harry Vaughan, John Snyder, first lady Bess Truman, Mary Margaret Truman and Secretary of War Henry Stimson. Fred M. Vinson is in the foreground.
Associated Press
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