A new coat gives more than warmth to Wauconda students

  • A young boy looks at options at Wauconda Grade School during a coat distribution event with Operation Warm on Tuesday.

      A young boy looks at options at Wauconda Grade School during a coat distribution event with Operation Warm on Tuesday. John Starks | Staff Photographer

  • Ezmerelda, 4, holds her new pink coat at Wauconda Grade School during a coat distribution event with Operation Warm on Tuesday.

      Ezmerelda, 4, holds her new pink coat at Wauconda Grade School during a coat distribution event with Operation Warm on Tuesday. John Starks | Staff Photographer

  • Jazmin, 9, a student at Wauconda Grade School, holds a new coat, hat, and shirt at a coat distribution event with Operation Warm Tuesday.

      Jazmin, 9, a student at Wauconda Grade School, holds a new coat, hat, and shirt at a coat distribution event with Operation Warm Tuesday. John Starks | Staff Photographer

 
 
Updated 12/10/2019 6:54 PM

The cold December air was not a concern for 300 new coat owners Tuesday at Wauconda Grade School. Operation Warm, a North American company that produces and distributes winter coats for families that need the help, provided the warmth for the third year in a row at the school,

"We are very fortunate," said principal Debbie Monroe. Her school has a 58% low-income population. "Most of the families here today have a student who goes here, but some don't. We don't turn anybody away."

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

Operation Warm uses donation funds to manufacture winter coats that are designed to give a child physical and emotional warmth and confidence to socialize and succeed. According to its mission statement, "A new coat is more than a coat."

Monroe says that is obvious when she sees what is in the lost and found box each year.

"There are nice, expensive things in there. But you know what's not in there. These coats," she says.

After choosing a new coat in a plastic wrapper, each child is encouraged to write a thank-you note that will be given to Operation Warm. Then teachers help each child write their name inside the liner with a permanent marker.

"Yes, it gives them ownership and makes it special for them," says Monroe.

Chicago-based Enchanted Backpack also donated socks, hats and shirts for each child.

0 Comments
  • Article Categories
  • News
                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 
Article Comments ()
Guidelines: Keep it civil and on topic; no profanity, vulgarity, slurs or personal attacks. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked. If a comment violates these standards or our terms of service, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box. To find our more, read our FAQ.