Fact check: Where Trump was wrong and right about Chicago violence

  • President Donald Trump speaks at the International Association of Chiefs of Police Convention Monday at McCormick Place in Chicago.

    President Donald Trump speaks at the International Association of Chiefs of Police Convention Monday at McCormick Place in Chicago. Associated press

 
Daily Herald report
Updated 10/28/2019 9:18 PM

Checking some of the things President Donald Trump said while at the International Association of Chiefs of Police conference in Chicago on Monday:

TRUMP: "Afghanistan is a safe place, by comparison" to Chicago.

 

FACTS: Apples-to-apples comparisons are difficult to come by. Afghanistan's intentional homicide rate per 100,000 people was 7.1 in 2017. Chicago's homicide rate from guns alone was 17.6 per 100,000 in 2018. But Afghanistan's count doesn't include deaths from war. The BBC found 2,307 people died in 611 "security incidents" in August alone; that's in a country of an estimated 38 million*.

MORE FACTS: St. Louis has the highest gun-related homicide rate among U.S. cities with 300,000 or more people, at 52.8 per 100,000. Baltimore, which Trump also has compared to Afghanistan, has 42.4. Chicago's 17.6 ranks ninth.

TRUMP claimed more than 1,500 people were murdered since Johnson was appointed police superintendent in 2016.

FACTS: Chicago police data shows more than 2,200 people were murdered in that time.

TRUMP also claimed that 13,067 people had been shot under Johnson's command.

FACTS: Since April 2016, only 11,967 have been shot, Chicago police say.

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TRUMP: "Chicago has the toughest gun laws in the United States."

FACTS: Illinois ranks eighth in the U.S. for strongest gun laws, according to the Giffords Law Center To Prevent Gun Violence. The state requires gun owners to obtain licenses and face background checks, and imposes waiting periods on purchases, the Associated Press reports. But unlike New York and California, Illinois does not ban assault weapons or large-capacity magazines

Sources: The World Bank, BBC, *estimate based on UN data, USA Today citing FBI, thecrimereport.org, ABC 7 Chicago, Associated Press

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