Stevenson students gather to honor victims of Sept. 11 attacks

  • Stevenson High School senior John Raymond plays "Taps" during a Sept. 11 remembrance ceremony outside the Lincolnshire school Wednesday. About 200 Stevenson students, faculty and staff joined local first responders and others at the event.

      Stevenson High School senior John Raymond plays "Taps" during a Sept. 11 remembrance ceremony outside the Lincolnshire school Wednesday. About 200 Stevenson students, faculty and staff joined local first responders and others at the event. Brian Hill | Staff Photographer

  • Stevenson High School student Ethan Meoman, 18, holds a flag Wednesday during a Sept. 11 remembrance ceremony outside the Lincolnshire school.

      Stevenson High School student Ethan Meoman, 18, holds a flag Wednesday during a Sept. 11 remembrance ceremony outside the Lincolnshire school. Brian Hill | Staff Photographer

  • A huge flag is flown from a ladder truck Wednesday as retired Marine Dino Moran, a physical education teacher at Stevenson High School, speaks to students and local first responders gathered in front of the Lincolnshire school for a Sept. 11 remembrance ceremony.

      A huge flag is flown from a ladder truck Wednesday as retired Marine Dino Moran, a physical education teacher at Stevenson High School, speaks to students and local first responders gathered in front of the Lincolnshire school for a Sept. 11 remembrance ceremony. Brian Hill | Staff Photographer

  • Retired Marine Dino Moran, a physical education teacher at Stevenson High School, speaks to the assembled crowd Wednesday during a Sept. 11 remembrance ceremony in Lincolnshire.

      Retired Marine Dino Moran, a physical education teacher at Stevenson High School, speaks to the assembled crowd Wednesday during a Sept. 11 remembrance ceremony in Lincolnshire. Brian Hill | Staff Photographer

  • Stevenson High School students cover their hearts as the national anthem is sung in front of the Lincolnshire school Wednesday for a Sept. 11 remembrance ceremony.

      Stevenson High School students cover their hearts as the national anthem is sung in front of the Lincolnshire school Wednesday for a Sept. 11 remembrance ceremony. Brian Hill | Staff Photographer

  • Stevenson High School student Samhita Madduru, 17, sings the national anthem Wednesday during a Sept. 11 remembrance ceremony at the Lincolnshire school.

      Stevenson High School student Samhita Madduru, 17, sings the national anthem Wednesday during a Sept. 11 remembrance ceremony at the Lincolnshire school. Brian Hill | Staff Photographer

  • First responders gathered with students in front of Stevenson High School in Lincolnshire for a Sept. 11 remembrance ceremony Wednesday.

      First responders gathered with students in front of Stevenson High School in Lincolnshire for a Sept. 11 remembrance ceremony Wednesday. Brian Hill | Staff Photographer

  • Mark Lozovnoy

    Mark Lozovnoy

  • Cameron Hirschhaut

    Cameron Hirschhaut

  • Gabi Siegel

    Gabi Siegel

 
By Samantha Jacobson
sjacobson@dailyherald.com
Updated 9/11/2019 11:47 PM

Students, faculty and staff members of Stevenson High School started their day early Wednesday to honor the lives lost during the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

About 200 in all gathered in the Lincolnshire school's Garden of Peace, Hope and Remembrance to remember the attacks and give their thanks to the local first responders who put their lives on the line.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

The ceremony was organized by the school's Students Helping Soldiers and included a student performance of the national anthem by senior Samhita Madduru, a moment of silence and a short speech by Dino Moran, a former marine and physical education instructor at Stevenson.

Current Stevenson students were born into a war on terrorism, said Mora, a co-sponsor of Students Helping Soldiers. He noted how remembering the attacks that happened 18 years ago is becoming more and more difficult.

"Ever since that day our country has not been the same, our world has not been the same," Moran said.

To senior Mark Lozovnoy, president of Students Helping Soldiers, such ceremonies become more important as the population of students born after the attacks increases.

"I grew up in a time where everyone talked about 9/11 but none of us experienced it," he said. "To make a presentation this big and to invite so many people, to honor their commitment and service that they've been doing their whole life, it's something that we need to do every single year."

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Junior Cameron Hirschhaut noted that he knows of the attacks only through the memories of his parents and teachers.

"My parents have told me that, before 9/11, when you dropped someone off at the airport you could walk them to their gate if you wanted," he said. "Now you can't even stop at the curb."

Senior Gabi Siegel said students feel the impact of the attacks despite having no knowledge of life before Sept. 11, 2001.

"It still completely affects every American and everyone in the world," she said.

Lozovnoy is hopeful that future generations will keep the memories alive.

"By inviting more and more people to come in every single year to talk about it and describe the situation I think that's the best way to teach and to continue teaching," he said.

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