Barrington Rotary Clubs want a bleeding-control kit in every classroom

  • Barrington's two Rotary Clubs are behind an effort to get a bleeding-control kit in every classroom in and around the village. The clubs are collaborating on the project with Barrington Area Unit District 220.

    Barrington's two Rotary Clubs are behind an effort to get a bleeding-control kit in every classroom in and around the village. The clubs are collaborating on the project with Barrington Area Unit District 220. Courtesy of Barrington Area Unit District 220

 
 
Updated 8/2/2019 4:01 PM

Barrington's two Rotary Clubs are behind an effort to get a bleeding-control kit in every classroom in and around the village.

It's part of the national Stop the Bleed initiative being encouraged by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. The hope is for bystanders to be trained, equipped and empowered to act before professional help arrives in the wake of a shooting or other emergency resulting in bleeding victims.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

Both Rotary Clubs are collaborating with Barrington Area Unit District 220 to get a kit into all public and private classrooms in the area. They're working to raise $16,340 within a month to buy an additional 430 kits to accomplish the goal, said Barrington Rotary member Trudy Wehren.

Last year, the Breakfast and Noon Rotary Clubs combined to purchase 184 bleeding-control kits for District 220 classrooms. Organizers also want kits in Barrington-area parks, the library and other public spaces.

"This is definitely a community effort," Wehren said.

Each kit costs $38 and typically has items such as a lightweight tourniquet, emergency trauma dressing, compressed gauze, survival blanket and surgical-type gloves.

District 220 created a section in its online store to directly accept donations for the kits at stbbarrington.com, then will handle purchasing and distribution. Training will be provided to employees on how to use the kits with support from the Barrington Fire Department.

by signing up you agree to our terms of service
                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

No matter how rapid the arrival of first responders, the Stop the Bleed campaign says, bystanders always will be first on the scene. Homeland Security says someone can die from blood loss within five minutes, which is why it's important to stop it as fast as possible.

Barrington Fire Chief Jim Arie said the local initiative began after Rotary members asked what he believed was the most critical community need.

"I explained that our focus is saving lives and the need for 'Stop The Bleed' kits," he said. "The Barrington Rotary Clubs immediately stepped up to help."

Over the past six years, at least 125,000 teachers, counselors and administrators across the country have been trained in stemming blood loss. In Bend, Oregon, high school personnel and students have been trained in how to stem blood loss, with some teenagers even raising money for the kits.

• Daily Herald wire services contributed to this report.

0 Comments
                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 
Article Comments ()
Guidelines: Keep it civil and on topic; no profanity, vulgarity, slurs or personal attacks. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked. If a comment violates these standards or our terms of service, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box. To find our more, read our FAQ.