Official: New facilities, more funding could keep college students in state

  • Added infrastructure and operations funding for state universities and colleges will help entice Illinois students to remain in the state for their college education, the interim director of the Illinois Board of Higher Education believes.

      Added infrastructure and operations funding for state universities and colleges will help entice Illinois students to remain in the state for their college education, the interim director of the Illinois Board of Higher Education believes. Joe Lewnard | Staff Photographer 2014

 
By Jerry Nowicki
Capitol News Illinois
Jnowicki@capitolnewsillinois.com
Updated 7/6/2019 6:53 PM

SPRINGFIELD -- The interim director of the Illinois Board of Higher Education is hopeful a combination of added infrastructure and operations funding for state universities and colleges will help entice Illinois students to remain in the state for their college education.

The cause of the optimism is state budget action which provided $154 million in new operations funding and $3.2 billion in new or reappropriated infrastructure funding to higher education.

by signing up you agree to our terms of service
                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

"Obviously, the universities are very happy. This will help take both the fiscal pressure off of them and help the universities and community colleges look more attractive," said Nyle Robinson, interim IBHE executive director.

Earlier this year, the IBHE reported that 48.4 percent of Illinois public high school graduates that enrolled in a four-year institution in 2017 chose an out-of-state school.

Robinson said he is hopeful the fiscal year 2020 budgetary action will help reverse that trend by providing added financial aid to key programs, increasing operational funds for universities to help them limit tuition increases, and providing capital funding to make campuses more enticing.

He also said an increase of $50 million to Monetary Award Program grants for low-income students would be particularly helpful in making college more affordable. The MAP grant program receives $451.3 million in funding in the budget -- a number Eric Zarnikow, executive director of the Illinois Student Assistance Commission, said is the largest single-year appropriation that program has ever received.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

"It's going to allow ISAC to serve more students and make up some of the purchasing power that the program has lost over the years," he said in a statement. "Overall, this budget for higher education is going to make college possible for more Illinois students."

Robinson said universities from other states were able to lure Illinois students away by offering better financial aid, but the increase to MAP grants should help begin to counteract that trend. He added that AIM High grants, which provide merit-based scholarships for Illinois students, will see $10 million in added funding, bringing the total to $35 million.

"That program is just getting underway, but universities report that it is changing the perception -- people are looking at our public universities again like they weren't before," Robinson said.

And higher education will receive $3.2 billion from the new $45 billion six-year capital infrastructure plan funded through sale of bonds, a doubling of the motor fuel tax and a massive gambling expansion among other measures. The money will fund 72 projects at four-year institutions and 91 projects at community colleges. Robinson said such projects have been "almost nonexistent" since 2004.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

"One aspect of attracting students back to Illinois is when they see that the state is taking higher education seriously over an extended period of time," he said. "When facilities start to run down and you go to other states and the facilities look shinier, Illinois is less attractive. So being able to have a capital plan which lasts six years, maybe longer, will definitely help."

The University of Illinois system will receive $815 million, Southern Illinois $295 million, Western Illinois $222 million, Illinois State $195 million, Eastern Illinois $147 million, Northern Illinois $140 million, Northeastern Illinois $132 million, Chicago State University $119 million and Governors State $33 million.

Community colleges will see $744 million, while private colleges and universities will see a total of $400 million.

In overall operations funding, community colleges, colleges and universities will see increases of about 5 percent, which Robinson said could help universities stave off tuition increases.

The budget also includes $1 million for the "Grow Your Own" program, which encourages Illinois parents and others connected to schools to become teachers in the state. The Illinois Math and Science Academy will see a 3 percent funding increase of $552,000.

Community college funding will be increased by 5 percent, or $13.9 million, for operating grants and the adult education system.

0 Comments
  • Article Categories
  • News
                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 
Article Comments ()
Guidelines: Keep it civil and on topic; no profanity, vulgarity, slurs or personal attacks. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked. If a comment violates these standards or our terms of service, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box. To find our more, read our FAQ.