Pritzker to sign 'Tobacco 21' legislation on purchases into law Sunday

  • Gov. J.B. Pritzker signs HB 2505, a bill allowing universities to retain unused AIM HIGH scholarship funds and allow for flexibility administering the program, during a press conference at Southeast High School, Thursday in Springfield. Sunday in Chicago he will sign legislation requiring people to be 21 to buy tobacco products.

    Gov. J.B. Pritzker signs HB 2505, a bill allowing universities to retain unused AIM HIGH scholarship funds and allow for flexibility administering the program, during a press conference at Southeast High School, Thursday in Springfield. Sunday in Chicago he will sign legislation requiring people to be 21 to buy tobacco products. Justin L. Fowler/The State Journal-Register via AP

 
Capitol News Illinois

Gov. J.B. Pritzker will sign into law a statewide initiative that raises from 18 to 21 the minimum age to purchase tobacco products.

The signing ceremony Sunday in Chicago marks the end of a four-year effort by lawmakers and advocates to change the age to buy products containing nicotine -- including cigarettes, e-cigarettes, vapes and chewing tobacco, to name a few.

Pritzker will be joined by the bill's sponsors, Democrats Camille Lilly, a representative from Chicago, and Julie Morrison, a senator from Deerfield.

"When things get out of hand or are no longer tolerable, the people speak, and we as legislators come to bring that message and advocate," Lilly said when the legislation passed the Senate in mid-March. "I get to have this be part of my history. I believe this is one of those bills that saves lives."

Also joining the governor will be Senate President John Cullerton, a Democrat from Chicago and longtime supporter of "Tobacco 21"; House Republican Leader Jim Durkin, from Western Springs; Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel; and U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin.

Supporters say those who do not begin smoking before the age of 21 are less likely to start later.

But opponents historically made the same major argument against changing the law -- that if 18 is old enough to vote in a political election, get married, open a bank account and join the armed forces, it should also be old enough to purchase and smoke a cigarette.

Detractors also were unhappy this session with the removal of language from current statute penalizing minors caught with tobacco products. They now risk the possibility of taking a "smoker's education or youth diversion program" with their parents, as well as the possibility of fines or community service.

0 Comments
 
Article Comments ()
Guidelines: Keep it civil and on topic; no profanity, vulgarity, slurs or personal attacks. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked. If a comment violates these standards or our terms of service, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box. To find our more, read our FAQ.