Crosses from Aurora workplace shooting now part of city's history

  • Christian Juarez, left, and Diana Juarez of Oswego, carry the cross with the name of their father, Vicente Juarez, from the Henry Pratt Co. to Pierce History and Art Center in Aurora on Sunday. The cross was one of five put up to honor the victims of the Feb. 15 shooting at the Pratt warehouse.

    Christian Juarez, left, and Diana Juarez of Oswego, carry the cross with the name of their father, Vicente Juarez, from the Henry Pratt Co. to Pierce History and Art Center in Aurora on Sunday. The cross was one of five put up to honor the victims of the Feb. 15 shooting at the Pratt warehouse. Bev Horne | Staff Photographer

  • The Aurora Historical Society's Pierce History and Art Center is displaying the five white crosses put up shortly after the Feb. 15 shooting at the Henry Pratt Co.

    The Aurora Historical Society's Pierce History and Art Center is displaying the five white crosses put up shortly after the Feb. 15 shooting at the Henry Pratt Co. Bev Horne | Staff Photographer

  • Mary Caffee-Twait of the Aurora Historical Society moves a memorial teddy bear into a van as five memorial crosses were moved from outside the Henry Pratt Co. to Pierce History and Art Center in Aurora on Sunday.

    Mary Caffee-Twait of the Aurora Historical Society moves a memorial teddy bear into a van as five memorial crosses were moved from outside the Henry Pratt Co. to Pierce History and Art Center in Aurora on Sunday. Bev Horne | Staff Photographer

  • Diana Juarez, right, comforts her mother Leticia, left, in memory of their father Vicente Juarez, who was killed in the Feb. 15 workplace shooting at the Henry Pratt Co. in Aurora. The family on Sunday helped move five crosses honoring the shooting victims.

    Diana Juarez, right, comforts her mother Leticia, left, in memory of their father Vicente Juarez, who was killed in the Feb. 15 workplace shooting at the Henry Pratt Co. in Aurora. The family on Sunday helped move five crosses honoring the shooting victims. Bev Horne | Staff Photographer

 
Daily Herald report
Updated 3/31/2019 6:56 PM

The five white crosses that helped bring comfort to a grieving community after one of Aurora's darkest days are now a permanent part of the city's history.

Built by Aurora resident Greg Zanis, the crosses went up shortly after five people were killed Feb. 15 in a shooting at the Henry Pratt Co. warehouse. Each bears the name of one of the victims: Clayton Parks, Trevor Wehner, Josh Pinkard, Russell Beyer and Vicente Juarez.

 

Members of the Juarez family were among those who delivered the crosses Sunday from outside the warehouse to the Aurora Historical Society's Pierce Art and History Center. They'll be displayed there through May 4 in the "Aurora Story" exhibit on the second floor.

"For the city to say we want these people to be remembered, it's special to me," said Juarez's daughter, Diana. "They're never going to be forgotten."

Zanis is know across the country for building and installing white crosses at sites of mass shootings and other episodes of gun violence. but these crosses were the first he'd had to make for his hometown.

The museum, at 20 E. Downer Place, is open noon to 4 p.m. Wednesdays through Saturdays. Admission is free.

0 Comments
                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 
Article Comments
Guidelines: Keep it civil and on topic; no profanity, vulgarity, slurs or personal attacks. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked. If a comment violates these standards or our terms of service, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box. To find our more, read our FAQ.