Settlement reached in insurance dispute after St. Charles man killed twins, self

 
 
Updated 10/8/2018 5:41 PM
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  • Randy Coffland, left, shown with, daughter Brittany and his wife, Anjum, changed his $500,000 insurance policy shortly before his death to benefit his brother and a close friend instead of Brittany and her twin sister, Tiffany. A settlement recently was reached in a lawsuit brought by Anjum Coffland seeking some of the money.

    Randy Coffland, left, shown with, daughter Brittany and his wife, Anjum, changed his $500,000 insurance policy shortly before his death to benefit his brother and a close friend instead of Brittany and her twin sister, Tiffany. A settlement recently was reached in a lawsuit brought by Anjum Coffland seeking some of the money. Courtesy of Antonia Galla

  • A mourner relights the candles at a memorial for murdered St. Charles twins Tiffany and Brittany Coffland in March 2017. A settlement in dispute over insurance beneficiaries recently was reached in Kane County.

    A mourner relights the candles at a memorial for murdered St. Charles twins Tiffany and Brittany Coffland in March 2017. A settlement in dispute over insurance beneficiaries recently was reached in Kane County. DAILY HERALD FILE PHOTO/RICK WEST

A lawsuit over the $500,000 life insurance policy of a St. Charles man who killed his twin daughters and wounded his estranged wife before turning the gun on himself in March 2017 has been settled.

Days before his death, Randy Coffland changed beneficiaries on an insurance policy from 16-year-olds Brittany and Tiffany Coffland to his brother, Russell Coffland of Concord, North Carolina, and a close friend, Terry Spurgeon, of Glendale Heights.

Anjum Coffland sued in August 2017, arguing her that estranged husband suffered from mental illness, that he was not of sound mind when he made the insurance change and that she should receive the money instead.

At the time, Anjum Coffland's attorney noted it would be an "uphill battle" to win the case, which, after a year of court dates and continuances, appeared headed to trial later this year.

But attorneys reached a settlement in late September that gives $250,000 to Russell Coffland, $150,000 to Anjum Coffland and $100,000 to Spurgeon, said Spurgeon's attorney Adam Stillo.

Stillo credited his client for being willing to receive less and noted Kane County Judge Kevin Busch had advocated the idea each of the parties should receive money under "some type of global solution."

"This was an unfortunate, terrible loss of life," Stillo said. "My client, Terry Spurgeon, was a very very good friend, worked with Mr. Coffland for many, many years."

Stillo noted Terry Spurgeon and her husband used to go out with the Cofflands as couples before the marriage of Randy and Anjum soured.

Stillo said his client believed Russell Coffland should get half the insurance money because he was Randy's brother.

"All in all, I think it was a fair disposition," Stillo said. "The brother to me is a real good guy."

Burton Brown, the lawyer for Anjum Coffland, said the case had a "fair outcome."

Brown said that the settlement avoided the risk of his client's losing at trial and that Spurgeon was a good friend, co-worker and overall "very nice lady" who would listen to Randy Coffland vent about his problems.

" (Anjum) is satisfied with the settlement," Brown said. "Of course, she wanted everything and didn't want Spurgeon to get a nickel."

Russell Coffland's attorney also said the case came to a fair resolution.

"He was not interested in giving up any part of his (insurance payout)," said attorney Richard Claahsen. "We're very glad this has been resolved. It spared all of the parties from having to relive the horror."

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