Arlington Heights borrows $10 million for flooding fixes

  • A restaurant owner clears debris left by flooding in July 2011 at the International Plaza in Arlington Heights. After that flood, village officials identified 17 projects aimed at alleviating flooding throughout town, and on Monday, trustees approved borrowing $10 million to fund some of that work.

      A restaurant owner clears debris left by flooding in July 2011 at the International Plaza in Arlington Heights. After that flood, village officials identified 17 projects aimed at alleviating flooding throughout town, and on Monday, trustees approved borrowing $10 million to fund some of that work. Joe Lewnard | Staff Photographer, July 2011

 
 
Posted8/21/2018 5:30 AM

Arlington Heights trustees Monday authorized borrowing nearly $10 million to help pay for infrastructure projects aimed at alleviating flooding throughout the village.

The funds -- available through a $9.9 million bond issuance at a 3.31 percent interest rate -- will be used to fund stormwater control measures identified following a massive July 2011 storm.

 

First up on the list is the $5.8 million project to increase the capacity of an existing stormwater detention basin on the northwest corner of Arlington Heights Road and Cypress Street. Engineering and design for the work began last month, with construction expected to run into late 2019 or early 2020.

The village also plans to spend $2.1 million to install larger sewer mains in the downtown area to reduce street and surface flooding. A $3.1 million project calls for larger storm pipes and more storage in the Greenbrier Park neighborhood. Some $700,000 also is budgeted for drainage improvements at Orchard Street and Burton Place and at Evergreen and Maude avenues.

A $6.25-per-month stormwater utility fee approved a year ago will pay the principal and interest on the $9.9 million in bonds over the next 20 years. Revenue from the fee also is going to village programs that provide residents new or improved access to village storm sewers, analyze the condition of storm sewers and reimburse residents a portion of the cost to install overhead sewers in their homes.

Village Manager Randy Recklaus said of 17 stormwater control projects identified, the ones deemed highest on the priority list for funding were those that could affect the greatest number of homes experiencing the most severe and frequent floods. About $30 million worth of projects lower on the priority list remain in limbo, absent another funding source, though Recklaus added that some benefits can be accomplished through the program that provides access to storm sewers.

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