Reflecting on where we are on anniversary of Sept. 11 attacks

 
Published9/5/2008 12:05 AM

As the Sept. 11 anniversary draws closer, five people I contacted referred to the 2001 attack as similar to Pearl Harbor but insist we must "live without focusing on fear and anger" but "keep 9/11 as a solemn day."

Young mom Julie Bosshart refuses to forget but nevertheless wants to be positive.

 

"We must live without focusing on fear and anger but we can't forget 9/11," Bosshart states. "Think of the attack on Pearl Harbor, our entrance into WWII. Those images sear into our history and memories. We must be vigilant, too. Our government is usually good at protecting us but they were unable to that day."

Bosshart asked if anyone worries that it could happen again and answered her question by saying she has concerns but refuses to live in fear. "We must live our lives and be thankful our loved ones are safe for the moment," she said. "We should be cautious but move forward. We are more suspicious."

John Selke expects safety and remembers Pearl Harbor. "Americans should ensure that our government, military and public service forces have monetary resources to prevent this ever occurring again. Our safety is imperative," Selke said. We haven't forgotten Pearl Harbor, have we? Building a strong America is everyone's responsibility. We need to teach those who follow what our responsibilities as Americans are. Remembering 9/11, the memorial sites and the ceremonies honoring the lost should continue as a reminder of how comfortable and lackadaisical we were, leaving us vulnerable to attack."

Hoffman Estates will honor the heroes of Sept. 11 at "Hoffman Estates Remembers: A Tribute to Courage" at 8 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 11, at Village Green Amphitheatre, 2850 Pratum Ave. in the Prairie Stone Business Park.

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A careful thinker, Donna Boomgarden said she watched in horror as the Sept. 11 events - the towers, the Pentagon, the Pennsylvania field - took place and says to keep Sept. 11 a solemn day.

"I believe 9/11 was the most horrific day in our nation's history and like Pearl Harbor, we need to remember," Boomgarden said. "Let's move past the pain and live to the fullest, not in constant fear but rather as if it is our last with all the fullness of life we can. I blame not only those who committed those acts but those who ordered the murders and our leaders for not thinking how their actions could impact our nation. I don't blame Islam but the sick group who thinks death and destruction is the only answer."

Public Works Director Ken Hari asked, "How long does one harbor negative feelings and ill will?" He said World War II is example. "Some believe promoting anger and hostility honors those who have fallen. I believe the opposite is true," Hari said. The only way to honor those who died is to use the event as an example of what happens when anger and hatred prevail. We should not forget."

The chairman of the Hoffman Estates Veterans' Commission Les Montag made another mention of Pearl Harbor.

"We should not bury Sept. 11 but we need to move on because Sept. 11 will never be forgotten just as Pearl Harbor hasn't been forgotten. Ceremonies and speakers will not bring back all the lives that were lost. Many are trying to capitalize for their own profit on the day. I say let the departed rest in peace."

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

Boomgarden says she doesn't hate but instead hopes for peace and is willing to forgive, but "will I ever forget? Absolutely not."

Bosshart summarized future tasks for citizens.

"It is hard to do but we must live each moment because we know not the day nor the hour. We need to be thankful for the blessings of our families, friends, our country and our freedom," Bosshart said.

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