Moving Day Chicago raises funds for Parkinson's disease research

  • Walkers get ready to step off during the 2019 Moving Day Chicago fundraiser for Parkinson's disease. This year's event takes place Oct. 24 at Soldier Field.

    Walkers get ready to step off during the 2019 Moving Day Chicago fundraiser for Parkinson's disease. This year's event takes place Oct. 24 at Soldier Field. Courtesy of Peggy VaGenius

 
 
Updated 10/24/2021 9:35 AM

It's time to get moving to help people who have a hard time doing just that.

Moving Day Chicago, which raises funds for Parkinson's disease research, will take place Sunday, Oct. 24, at Soldier Field. This celebration of movement features a family-friendly walk course, a kids' area, a caregivers' relaxation tent and a special Movement Pavilion featuring yoga, dance, Tai Chi, Pilates and other methods proven to help manage Parkinson's symptoms.

 

According to the Parkinson's Foundation website, nearly 1 million people in the U.S. are living with Parkinson's disease, which is more than those diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, muscular dystrophy and Lou Gehrig's disease combined.

The website also states that approximately 60,000 Americans are diagnosed with PD each year, and more than 10 million worldwide are living with the disease.

Motor symptoms, which develop slowly over time, include tremors and gait and balance problems. Other symptoms may include depression and cognitive impairment.

There is currently no cure for Parkinson's, but there are different treatments, including medication, surgical therapy and lifestyle modifications, that can help alleviate symptoms.

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Participants at this year's Moving Day Chicago event can learn more about Parkinson's research as well as genetic testing, which will be offered on-site as part of the PD GENEration research study. Testing can help discover biological pathways that cause PD, which can lead researchers to improved treatments.

For more information, visit www.parkinson.org/greaterillinois or call (800) 4PD-INFO (473-4636).

Beth Richman shares more about Parkinson's disease and how it has affected Tony Coleman of Carpentersville and his family.

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