Vaccines work and are key to stopping virus

 
Updated 9/22/2021 1:09 PM

I eagerly got in line to receive my COVID-19 vaccination. As hospital faculty, I was fortunate to be among the first to receive an inoculation that I and the vast majority of doctors, see as the best way to end this global coronavirus pandemic. I will also gladly get the booster shot if the scientific experts decide it's necessary and when it's my turn.

This virus is not going away without more people getting vaccinated to stop the spread. Widespread vaccination is key to the eradication of COVID-19. By getting vaccinated, I'm not only protecting myself, but also my family and my patients. I would encourage each and every person to talk to your doctor about the vaccine.

 

Let me tell you why I did not hesitate to get my shot: Vaccines work. We have proved vaccine success stories for combating deadly diseases such as polio, measles and smallpox. And now we have one FDA-approved vaccine for fighting the current deadly disease and two others with emergency use authorization that are likely to gain full approval soon. All three have gone through rigorous scientific testing, including safety evaluations and regulatory processes before public release.

There is a light at the end of tunnel. If you are unvaccinated, talk to a doctor. We are ready to answer your questions and help you understand the importance of vaccination.

Regan Thomas, President

Illinois State Medical Society

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