Out of control pensions must stop

 
Published11/19/2007 5:10 AM

To the editor: The recent articles on the suburban education system have shed light on a public-supported entity that has been out of control for years.

Why the largest economic and political union in the state can't be reined in is beyond comprehension. I wish the Herald would present "The Rest Of The Story," concerning the following, relative to District 211 only:

 

What is the average age of retirement for a teacher; the average end of career money given at retirement; the complete retirement benefit package? Their retirement grows an automatic 3 percent per year compounded, so what is the average given to them after 10 years?

Shouldn't not having to pay into Social Security be counted as additional take home pay? How many teachers retire early? Are teachers still getting 20 pay increases annually to boost retirement pensions even though there has been legislative changes?

It never seemed honorable for suburban systems to give their teachers large end of career increases and then ship the pension burden to the rest of the state.

Do you think people realize state pensions (especially educational related ones) are draining the state of tax money affecting all aspects of state funding -- eventually leading either to default or putting an excessive burden on younger and older generations?

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Do we really think increases in gambling, gasoline, alcohol, tollway and cigarette taxes will fund these multimillion dollar retirements?

We must reform public pension programs or this state will be broke in 10 years. We should not be working on ways to fund state pensions, we should be making legislative changes to reduce excessive ballooning pensions.

I am a electrical engineer and although semi-retired have worked many times 50 and 60 hours a week with barely two weeks a year vacation to complete a project or get a product out the door as well as carrying responsibilities for my subordinates, scheduling, interfacing to management, solving technical problems and emergencies.

Engineers have to stay abreast of state-of-the-art or become obsolete. State Professional Engineers must earn 30 PDH credits every other year.

I would love to walk into the school system and get anywhere near the compensation that would befit my experience, education, and knowledge but of course I know this is not possible because the school system is a closed union shop.

Stephen J Ledvina

Schaumburg

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