'Napalm Girl' Kim Phuc receives German prize for peace work

  • In this Sept. 25, 2015 photo, Kim Phuc poses for a photo at a hotel in Miami.

    In this Sept. 25, 2015 photo, Kim Phuc poses for a photo at a hotel in Miami. Associated Press

  • FILE - In this June 8, 1972 file photo, South Vietnamese forces follow after terrified children, including 9-year-old Kim Phuc, center, as they run down Route 1 near Trang Bang after an aerial napalm attack on suspected Viet Cong hiding places. A South Vietnamese plane accidentally dropped its flaming napalm on South Vietnamese troops and civilians. The terrified girl had ripped off her burning clothes while fleeing. The children from left to right are: Phan Thanh Tam, younger brother of Kim Phuc, who lost an eye, Phan Thanh Phouc, youngest brother of Kim Phuc, Kim Phuc, and Kim's cousins Ho Van Bon, and Ho Thi Ting. Behind them are soldiers of the Vietnam Army 25th Division.

    FILE - In this June 8, 1972 file photo, South Vietnamese forces follow after terrified children, including 9-year-old Kim Phuc, center, as they run down Route 1 near Trang Bang after an aerial napalm attack on suspected Viet Cong hiding places. A South Vietnamese plane accidentally dropped its flaming napalm on South Vietnamese troops and civilians. The terrified girl had ripped off her burning clothes while fleeing. The children from left to right are: Phan Thanh Tam, younger brother of Kim Phuc, who lost an eye, Phan Thanh Phouc, youngest brother of Kim Phuc, Kim Phuc, and Kim's cousins Ho Van Bon, and Ho Thi Ting. Behind them are soldiers of the Vietnam Army 25th Division. Associated Press

 
 

BERLIN -- Kim Phuc, known as the 'Napalm Girl' in an iconic 1972 Vietnam War photo, is receiving a 10,000 euro ($11,350) award in Germany for her work for peace.

Organizers of the Dresden Prize say the 55-year-old, who now lives in Canada, is being honored Monday for her support of UNESCO and children wounded in war, and for speaking out publicly against violence and hatred.

Past recipients of the prize include former Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev and American civil rights activist Tommie Smith.

Phuc was nine when a South Vietnamese plane dropped napalm bombs on her village, believing it harbored enemy North Vietnamese troops.

The scene of Phuc running down a road crying, naked and with burns across her body was captured by Associated Press photographer Nick Ut , winning a Pulitzer Prize in 1973.

0 Comments
 
Article Comments ()
Guidelines: Keep it civil and on topic; no profanity, vulgarity, slurs or personal attacks. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked. If a comment violates these standards or our terms of service, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box. To find our more, read our FAQ.