The Latest: Illinois House delays budget override action

  • Senate President John Cullerton, D-Chicago, second from left, speaks with Senate Minority Leader Bill Brady, R-Bloomington on Tuesday, July 4, 2017, on the Senate floor at the Capitol in Springfield, Ill. The Illinois Senate has OK'd an annual spending plan of $36 billion following a critical vote to raise the income tax rate. If approved by Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner, it would be Illinois' first budget in more than two years. (Rich Saal/The State Journal-Register via AP)

    Senate President John Cullerton, D-Chicago, second from left, speaks with Senate Minority Leader Bill Brady, R-Bloomington on Tuesday, July 4, 2017, on the Senate floor at the Capitol in Springfield, Ill. The Illinois Senate has OK'd an annual spending plan of $36 billion following a critical vote to raise the income tax rate. If approved by Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner, it would be Illinois' first budget in more than two years. (Rich Saal/The State Journal-Register via AP) Associated Press

  • House Speaker Michael Madigan, D-Chicago, left, and Senate President John Cullerton, D-Chicago, talk on the Senate floor Tuesday, July 4, 2017, at the Capitol in Springfield, Ill. The Illinois Senate has OK'd an annual spending plan of $36 billion following a critical vote to raise the income tax rate. If approved by Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner, it would be Illinois' first budget in more than two years. (Rich Saal/The State Journal-Register via AP)

    House Speaker Michael Madigan, D-Chicago, left, and Senate President John Cullerton, D-Chicago, talk on the Senate floor Tuesday, July 4, 2017, at the Capitol in Springfield, Ill. The Illinois Senate has OK'd an annual spending plan of $36 billion following a critical vote to raise the income tax rate. If approved by Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner, it would be Illinois' first budget in more than two years. (Rich Saal/The State Journal-Register via AP) Associated Press

  • Sen. Dale Righter, R-Mattoon, right, talks with Sen. Michael Connelly, R-Naperville, Tuesday, July 4, 2017, on the Senate floor at the Capitol in Springfield, Ill. The Illinois Senate has OK'd an annual spending plan of $36 billion following a critical vote to raise the income tax rate.  If approved by Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner, it would be Illinois' first budget in more than two years. (Rich Saal/The State Journal-Register via AP)

    Sen. Dale Righter, R-Mattoon, right, talks with Sen. Michael Connelly, R-Naperville, Tuesday, July 4, 2017, on the Senate floor at the Capitol in Springfield, Ill. The Illinois Senate has OK'd an annual spending plan of $36 billion following a critical vote to raise the income tax rate. If approved by Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner, it would be Illinois' first budget in more than two years. (Rich Saal/The State Journal-Register via AP) Associated Press

  • Senate Minority Leader Bill Brady, R-Bloomington, right, listens to the brief debate on a package of budget bills passed by the Senate on Tuesday, July 4, 2017, at the Capitol in Springfield, Ill. The Illinois Senate has OK'd an annual spending plan of $36 billion following a critical vote to raise the income tax rate. If approved by Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner, it would be Illinois' first budget in more than two years. (Rich Saal/The State Journal-Register via AP)

    Senate Minority Leader Bill Brady, R-Bloomington, right, listens to the brief debate on a package of budget bills passed by the Senate on Tuesday, July 4, 2017, at the Capitol in Springfield, Ill. The Illinois Senate has OK'd an annual spending plan of $36 billion following a critical vote to raise the income tax rate. If approved by Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner, it would be Illinois' first budget in more than two years. (Rich Saal/The State Journal-Register via AP) Associated Press

 
 
Updated 7/5/2017 9:22 AM

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. -- The Latest on the Illinois Legislature's action to address the nation's longest state budget stalemate (all times local):

10:20 a.m.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

The Illinois House has adjourned and scheduled a Thursday session which could feature votes to override a budget-deal veto.

The fate of the nation's longest-running state budget crisis since at least the Great Depression rests with the House, which lacked a quorum for action Wednesday.

Gov. Bruce Rauner on Tuesday vetoed a package of legislation that raised the income tax by $5 billion to finance a $36 billion spending plan, which would be Illinois' first budget since 2015.

The Senate swiftly voted to override the vetoes Wednesday and sent them to the House.

Only 59 of the chamber's 118 members answered the roll call Wednesday. Deputy Democratic Leader Arthur Turner of Chicago was in the chair. He adjourned the House until 1:30 p.m. Thursday.

___

12:10 a.m.

A package of legislation aimed at ending a two-year Illinois budget standoff is back to the House.

The House convenes Wednesday to face action to override Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner's vetoes of a $36 billion budget fueled by a $5 billion increase in income taxes.

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The legislation bounced several times Tuesday. The Senate approved the budget plan and tax increase with a necessary three-fifths majority vote, but Rauner vetoed them three hours later.

The Senate then wasted no time in overriding the vetoes and sending them back to the House for consideration.

Democratic House Speaker Michael Madigan of Chicago announced after the Senate action there wouldn't be a House vote but didn't say why.

But the House quorum call was answered by only 54 of its 118 members.

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