Schaumburg High School art class meets special needs

  • The A100 art course allows students in the Multiply Challenged Program to participate in an art elective that was not previously offered at Schaumburg High School.

    The A100 art course allows students in the Multiply Challenged Program to participate in an art elective that was not previously offered at Schaumburg High School. Courtesy of District 211

  • A special education student in the Multiply Challenged Program at Schaumburg High School paints in art class.

    A special education student in the Multiply Challenged Program at Schaumburg High School paints in art class. Courtesy of District 211

 
Submitted by District 211

For the first time, special education students in the Multiply Challenged Program at Schaumburg High School are showcasing their talents and creativity in art class.

The course allows students in the Multiply Challenged Program to participate in an art elective that was not previously offered. Many of the students in the program are nonverbal and non-ambulatory, and the hands-on experiences during class are adapted for the students' varying physical and visual impairments.

With the assistance of school staff and teachers, students break up their daily routine by painting, drawing, ceramics and printmaking, which allows the students to express themselves.

"We celebrate the work of artists from many different cultures throughout history, as well as those with alternative abilities," said Gordon James, art department chairman at Schaumburg High School.

"This experience is both physically and emotionally engaging for our MC students, and allows them to have increased exposure to new staff and students in our SHS community.

"They are an integral part of the SHS family and we are happy to honor the work they do with communal art shows for the students, staff, and parents of SHS."

Earlier in the school year, students had an art show called "Chaos & Control" that displayed their work to the school community. The students used their augmentative communication devices to talk about their artwork. The work was then displayed in the faculty lounge.