Lincolnshire students learn from giant map of Africa

 
By Gilbert R. Boucher II
gboucher@dailyherald.com
Updated 1/9/2017 1:51 PM
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  • Half Day School fourth-graders Sarah Horwitz, left, and Jasmine Liu look for the Niger River as they read clues while they study about Africa using a giant map at the Lincolnshire school Monday. The map, which is on loan from National Geographic's Giant Traveling Maps program, measures 26 feet by 35 feet.

      Half Day School fourth-graders Sarah Horwitz, left, and Jasmine Liu look for the Niger River as they read clues while they study about Africa using a giant map at the Lincolnshire school Monday. The map, which is on loan from National Geographic's Giant Traveling Maps program, measures 26 feet by 35 feet. Gilbert R. Boucher II | Staff Photographer

  • Half Day School fourth grade teacher Kelsey LaBelle leads her students around a giant map of Africa at the Lincolnshire school Monday. The map is on loan from National Geographic's Giant Traveling Maps program and measures 26 feet by 35 feet.

      Half Day School fourth grade teacher Kelsey LaBelle leads her students around a giant map of Africa at the Lincolnshire school Monday. The map is on loan from National Geographic's Giant Traveling Maps program and measures 26 feet by 35 feet. Gilbert R. Boucher II | Staff Photographer

Fourth-graders leapt like lemurs, walked like an Egyptian, and swung their trunks like elephants while they played a game on the world's largest map of Africa at Half Day School on Monday.

The map is part of National Geographic's Giant Traveling Maps program and is at the Lincolnshire school for two weeks to help bring African geography alive for students.

"This is a tangible way for students to interact with geography. Which is kind of hard to do. We can't travel to Africa," said fourth grade teacher Kelsey LaBelle. "So this is a perfect way to have them explore a different part of the world. They love it."

Third- and fourth-graders walk on the giant map that measures 26 feet by 35 feet as they explore the continent's mountains, rivers, animals, and culture through fun, learning activities.

"It's really exciting. It's fun to play games with my friends and learn about new countries," fourth-grader Arushi Srinivasan said while trying to find African landmarks with her classmates. "I really like learning about Egypt because that is where the Great Pyramids of Giza are."

Volunteers from District 103 Parent Teacher Organization (PTO) Cultural Arts committee were responsible for bringing the project to the school.

To learn more about the Giant Traveling Map of Africa, visit http://nationalgeographic.org/education/giant-traveling-maps/africa/.

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